Archives for April 2013

Video: Nicole Baker Fulgham on What Christians Can Do to Improve Public Education

Educating All God's Children

Here is the fourth of four videos with Nicole Baker Fulgham, author of the new book Educating All God’s Children: What Christians Can—and Should—Do to Improve Public Education for Low-Income Kids

In the first video, Baker Fulgham introduced Educating All God’s Children.

In the second video, Baker Fulgham discussed the challenges that face public education.

In the third video, Baker Fulgham addressed why Christians should champion public education.

 

The Tour This Week

Every Monday we will provide an update on upcoming media, speaking events, and book signings for Jim Wallis.

On Gods Side

Monday, April 29, in Pasadena, CA:
The Stephanie Miller Show, at 8:00 a.m. PT
– All Saints Episcopal Church, at 7:00 p.m. PT

Tuesday, April 30, in Claremont, CA, and Los Angeles, CA:
Claremont School of Theology, at 4:00 p.m. PT
Bel Air Presbyterian Church, at 7:30 p.m. PT

Wednesday, May 1, in San Diego, CA:
The City Club of San Diego, at 12:00 p.m. PT

Thursday, May 2, in San Francisco, CA:
Forum on KQED-FM NPR, at 10:00 a.m. PT
– KPFA-FM, at 1:00 p.m. PT
First Congregational Church of Berkeley, at 7:30 p.m. PT

Friday, May 3, in San Francisco, CA:
The Ronn Owens Show on KGO-AM (CBS), at 10:00 a.m. PT
– City Church, at 6:30 p.m. PT
Public Radio International, The Tavis Smiley Show, air time TBD

Sunday, May 5, in San Francisco, CA, and Corte Madera, CA:
Grace Cathedral’s The Forum, at 9:30 a.m. PT
Book Passage, at 1:00 p.m. PT

Monday, May 6, in Denver, CO:
9 Morning News on KUSA-TV NBC, at 8:05 a.m. MT
– Tattered Cover Book Store, at 7:30 p.m. MT

 

Additional information on these events can be found via the On God’s Side web site: http://www.OnGodsSide.com.

The Weekly Hit List: April 26, 2013

Educating All God's ChildrenEducating All God’s Children by Nicole Baker Fulgham was reviewed by Teach For America’s Chief Knowledge Officer Steven Farr.

“Nicole’s book comes from a Christian perspective, but raises I think critical questions for all of us–of all faiths and lacks thereof–about WHY we are pursuing education equity. . . .

“Maybe (and I hope that) Nicole is right that Christians in this country are “uniquely situated to help solve the problem” of educational equity.  I am inspired by Nicole’s vision that the massive network of Christian churches in the US could–in the same way many were central in the Civil Rights movement–could be a key force in changing the education system.”

Read the rest of the review here.

 

Nicole Baker Fulgham also wrote for the Teach For America blog: “Don’t ‘Those Parents’ Know What’s Best For Their Kids?”

 

On God’s Side media:

“The Afternoon Shift” on Chicago Public Radio, WBEZ-FM

CultureCast on Patheos

Chicago Reader

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

“Partisanship and the Common Good on Juicy Ecumenism

“Jim Wallis on Overcoming Terrorism by Brandan Robertson

 

Quick Hits:

Brian Larson of Trinity Lutheran Church was interviewed about how he built a congregational singing event around Psalms for All Seasons.

Of Games and God by Kevin Schut was recommended by Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books.

Of Games and God was also mentioned by The Cardus Daily.

Broken Hallelujahs by Christian Scharen was recommended by Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books.

Eyes Wide Open by William D. Romanowski was recommended by Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books.

 

Ebook Specials and Other Offers:

April ebook specials are currently running for multiple Brazos Press and Baker Academic titles. All of these are at least 50% off.

Living into Focus by Arthur Boers
Living the Sabbath by Norman Wirzba
Psalms as Torah by Gordon J. Wenham
The Virtuous Reader by Richard S. Briggs

Lectionary Reflection for the Fifth Sunday of Easter

This excerpt comes from Revelation (BTCB) by Joseph L. Mangina, commenting on Revelation 21:1-6:

The vision in Rev. 21 opens with a great divine act of re-creation. As only God can create, calling suns and stars, water and land into existence at the beginning, so only God can restore, bringing into being a new world in which his will for his creatures is fully realized.

Apocalypse recapitulates Genesis. A fresh start is made. The first heaven and the first earth are not said to be destroyed, like death and hades in the previous chapter. John simply says that they “passed away” (apēltham). “The sea was no more,” not because the ocean as such is cursed, but because the sea in Israel’s imagination represents chaos, darkness, the deep. Now chaos yields to cosmos, disorder to peace, death to life.

God does this. It is not the outcome of any human scientific or technological achievement. The new city comes “down out of heaven from God,” a sheer miracle, a gift apocalyptically bestowed at the end of history and not the outcome of history itself. The unmistakable apocalyptic signature here is the word idou (“behold”), uttered first by a “loud voice from the throne” (21:3) and repeated by “he who was seated on the throne” (21:5).

his unambiguous act of divine speech is the first such we have heard since 1:8. Idou invites us not to act but to see, not to perform but to watch in awe, not to take action but to rejoice, welcoming the city’s gracious manifestation among us. . . .

The goal of all this is the establishing of communion: “Behold, the dwelling place [skēnē] of God is with man. He will dwell with them [skēnōsei met’ autōn], and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God” (21:3). The language is drawn from the law (Lev. 26:12) and the prophets (Ezek. 27:27), reminding us that the people of this God can only be Israel and not some generic “humanity.”

If grace does not destroy nature, still less does the new creation annul God’s covenant with Abraham! The language bespeaks a covenantal sense of mutuality, God with his people, the people with their God. The long history that reaches from Moses to David to Jeremiah and beyond is not undone.

Yet just as in the new creation imagery, John seems to envisage a certain return to the beginning: thus the image of the desert tabernacle, the skēnē, the tent of the divine presence. The tape is being rewound, past the historical Jerusalem with its compromised history, past even the settlement of the land, to the time of Israel’s wilderness wanderings. It is as though God’s new dwelling with Israel will combine the splendor of life in the city with the simplicity of life in the wilderness, when, for Jeremiah anyway, the bride of YHWH was still faithful to her spouse (Jer. 2:1-2).

But skēnē is also the language of incarnation. It is the term John the Evangelist uses to speak of the Son of God’s “tenting” or “tabernacling” in human flesh (John 1:14). Not, of course, that the heavenly city is identical with Christ’s historical sojourn in the flesh. But the city inhabits the space of divine-human communion he has established.

The “dwelling of God is with man,” first and decisively in Christ himself, then in the church so far as it is joined to his divine-human, life-giving person.

 

©2010 by Joseph L. Mangina. Published by Brazos Press. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

Video: Nicole Baker Fulgham on Why Christians Should Champion Public Education

Here is the third of four videos with Nicole Baker Fulgham, author of the new book Educating All God’s Children: What Christians Can—and Should—Do to Improve Public Education for Low-Income Kids

 

The Tour This Week

Every Monday we will provide an update on upcoming media, speaking events, and book signings for Jim Wallis.

On Gods Side

Tuesday, April 23, in Chicago, IL:
The Divinity School at the University of Chicago with the Seminary Coop, at 1:00 p.m. CT
Debate at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, at 7:00 p.m. CT

Wednesday, April 24, in Chicago, IL:
Michigan Avenue Forum at Fourth Presbyterian Church with Eboo Patel, at 12:00 p.m. CT
“The Afternoon Shift” on WBEZ-FM Chicago Public Radio, at 2:00 p.m. CT
Winnetka Congregational Church, at 7:00 p.m. CT

Sunday, April 28, in Washington, DC:
Washington National Cathedral, at 10:10 a.m. ET

Monday, April 29, in Pasadena, CA:
All Saints Episcopal Church, at 7:00 p.m. PT

 

Additional information on these events can be found via the On God’s Side web site: http://www.OnGodsSide.com.

The Weekly Hit List: April 19, 2013

Of Games and GodOf Games and God by Kevin Schut received a 4.5 star review from Ted Turnau for Christianity Today

“Evangelical Christian books on video games have typically been dreary, censorious affairs. Painting with oversized brushes, concerned authors with knitted brows have warned us for decades that our children and country are going to hell in a handbasket because of these games. They have not, let us say, been all that subtle or nuanced in their assessments.

“As a ‘gamer’ myself, I have toyed with writing a book on video games, since there seemed to be a need for a balanced voice in the conversation.”

“I’m glad I never got started on that project. Kevin Schut has already written it.”

Read the rest of the review here.

 

On God’s Side media:

 “Tell Me More” on NPR

– KUOW-FM NPR, Seattle, “Weekday”

Newsweek, “God and Country”

Powell’s Books

The Huffington Post, “We Are in a Battle for the Common Good”

– Washington Square News, “National and community prosperity require rapport-building”

Don’t miss Jim Wallis tomorrow (Saturday, April 20) on the Melissa Harris-Perry Show (MSNBC), at 10:00 a.m. ET. The show will focus on the Boston Marathon bombings.

 

Quick Hits:

Living into Focus by Arthur Boers is a finalist in the Christian living category of The 2013 Word Awards.

Nicole Baker Fulgham, author of Educating All God’s Children  will appear on The Dr. Kay Show with Dr. Kay McElvey on 1240 WCEM-AM on Monday, April 22, at 11:00 a.m. ET

Educating All God’s Children was mentioned by Joshua DuBois in The Daily Beast.

Speaking of Dying by Fred Craddock, Dale Goldsmith, and Joy V. Goldsmith was reviewed by The Christian Century.

The Evolution of Adam by Peter Enns was reviewed by The Christian Century.

Claiming Abraham by Michael Lodahl was reviewed in Church Times (full review available to subscribers): “[Lodahl] reveals the most critical and significant differences between the two faiths, and also their common concerns.”

 

Ebook Specials and Other Offers:

April ebook specials are currently running for multiple Brazos Press and Baker Academic titles. All of these are at least 50% off.

Living into Focus by Arthur Boers
Living the Sabbath by Norman Wirzba
Psalms as Torah by Gordon J. Wenham
The Virtuous Reader by Richard S. Briggs

Lectionary Reflection for the Fourth Sunday of Easter

This excerpt comes from Revelation (BTCB) by Joseph L. Mangina, commenting on Revelation 7:9-17:

As in the scene of the Lamb’s presentation in Rev. 5, so here too the meaning of the vision is brought out by a dialogue between John and an elder. The elder asks John: “Who are these, clothed in white robes, and from where have they come?”

In what amounts to a polite confession of ignorance John replies, “Sir, you know.” The elder then identifies this white-robed army as “the ones coming out of the great tribulation,” those who have “washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb.”

“Tribulation” (thlipsis) is one of the great themes of the Apocalypse, as we have already seen in the discussion of the seven churches and the seven seals. The present vision invites us to penetrate more deeply into the meaning of this key term.

If, up to this point, the meaning of thlipsis has been centered on suffering or even punishment (cf. 2:9-10), now we see that the distress of God’s people is in fact their passage from death into life. Their suffering is a cleansing, a clothing, perhaps even an investiture in office corresponding to the Lamb’s own.

By virtue of his high-priestly work they themselves have become a kingdom of priests, standing “before the throne of God, and serv[ing] him day and night in his temple” (7:15). The Lamb’s death thus marks the birth pangs of the new creation, so that to be his follower and witness is to participate in the life he brings.

We now step back to examine the two parts of the vision synoptically. This is a vision of the people of God, the saints; but is either of these groups to be identified with the church? We might well doubt it. One of the more curious features of the Apocalypse is the complete absence of the word ekklēsia in the main body of the work, between the close of the letters to the churches (3:22) and the concluding lines (22:16). . . .

As the oracles to the church indicate, the ekklēsia is indeed the audience of Revelation, and in a quite literal sense the congregations are hearing the book read aloud. The prophecy does not, however, simply reproduce their empirical ecclesiality, answering history (the time of the old eon) with more history. The churches are being show a novum, the new thing that is coming, life on the far side of the great tribulation that is coming over all the world.

In this sense we might say that the subject matter of the vision is not the church present and visible, but the eschatological people of God. The vision is not of what the churches are, but of what they are called to become.

 

©2010 by Joseph L. Mangina. Published by Brazos Press. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

Video: Nicole Baker Fulgham on What Challenges Face Public Education

Here is the second of four videos with Nicole Baker Fulgham, author of the new book Educating All God’s Children: What Christians Can—and Should—Do to Improve Public Education for Low-Income Kids

 

April Ebook Specials

Now through the end of April, several ebooks from Brazos Press & Baker Academic are on sale.

Click on each book cover for more information about that title.

For a list of places to purchase the ebooks, visit www.brazospress.com/ebookspecials.

 Cover Art  Cover Art  Cover Art
Retail Price: $20

Discounted Price:
$9.99 – 50% off!

Retail Price: $20

Discounted Price: 
$9.99 – 50% off!

Retail Price: $22.99

Discounted Price: 
$9.99 – 56% off!

 Cover Art
Retail Price: $27

Discounted Price:
$9.99 – 63% off!