The Weekly Hit List: May 15, 2015

Desiring God featured “God Is Bigger Than My Cancer” by J. Todd Billings, author of Rejoicing in Lament.

PrintCancer changes your perception of life. Each day comes to us as a gift from the gracious hand of God — whether it is the last day of a short life or the first day of a long and healthy life. But living into the reality that each day is a gift also involves coming to recognize a stark, biblical truth that is deeply countercultural: God is not our debtor.

Surely God is not capricious or untrustworthy. God has disclosed himself as gracious in his dealings with creation, with Israel, and most fully, in Jesus Christ. The Triune God binds himself to covenant promises that include, envelop, and hold us in a communion that sin and death cannot break. God is faithful to these promises, fulfilled in Jesus Christ.

But this does not mean life is “fair,” or that we are shielded from all of the present consequences of sin and death. God is not our debtor. He does not “owe” us a certain number of requisite years of life.

Read the entire article here.

 

 

Wesley Hill, author of Spiritual Friendship, was interviewed by Peter Smith for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Wesley Hill is convinced that taking a road less traveled doesn’t have to be a lonely journey.

Mr. Hill, a professor at Trinity School for Ministry in Ambridge, and a small corps of other writers around the country have churned out a small library of books and blog posts, united in a single premise.

They believe gay Christians can and should affirm their sexual orientation — but should also commit to celibacy.

Read all of “Gay and celibate: Some Christians affirming their homosexuality but pledging to forgo sex” here.

Toledo’s The Blade also ran this interview: “Reviving tradition of spiritual friendship”

 

 

Foreword Reviews reviewed Nonviolent Action by Ronald J. Sider.

Nonviolent ActionSider boldly states that nonviolence can work and work very well. But his vision is not some idealistic dream. Study, training, and organization are needed to fully execute this vision, he says. And it is not the easy or safe route—that’s why faith is critical; as with Christ, modern-day nonviolence may be met with violence and death. This sober reality showcases the gravity of people’s often-glib aversion to violence. But this approach is urgently needed: “The twentieth century was the bloodiest in human history.” Sider also highlights the opportunities of the present time—like the role of social media during the Arab Spring—but focuses primarily on the most timeless of assets, like prayer, persistence, and community.

While his approach is academic and well researched, it’s also intensely readable. He summarizes events and ideas well without oversimplifying. While the task at hand is daunting, his voice is friendly and optimistic.

Read the entire review here.

 

Quick Hits:

Traces of the Trinity by Peter J. Leithart was reviewed  by Michael Hansen for Torrey Gazette.

Peter Enns discussed his book The Evolution of Adam in “11 recurring mistakes in the debate over the ‘historical Adam’.”