The Weekly Hit List: A regular round-up of all things Brazos from around the web - including reviews, interviews and other activity.

The Weekly Hit List: October 31, 2014

Scot McKnight, author of Kingdom Conspiracy, was interviewed by Patheos blogger Zach Hoag.

“I have been thinking about and writing about kingdom for nearly twenty years now, and I first published something about kingdom at an extensive level in 1999 in A New Vision for Israel. At that time I was already connecting ‘kingdom’ to ‘Israel’ but I was in a historical mode and not much of a theological mode.

“As my life shifted into college student teaching, I began to think about that view of kingdom more and more theologically so that I could explain the significance of kingdom to students who were wondering why this term even mattered. I published a few observations about kingdom in this more theological mode in books like Embracing Grace, One.Life, and The King Jesus Gospel.

“But I wasn’t happy because (1) I wasn’t sorting out what I was seeing in the Bible comprehensively enough and (2) I was hearing an increasing use of this term in ways that bothered me because the uses were veering far from what the Bible means.

“So, there, that’s why I wrote this book: to set out my thoughts in the context of an increasing popularity of a term that was being used in ways significantly different than the Bible’s use.”

Read the entire interview, “Skinny Jeans, Ruffled Feathers, and Kingdom Mission,” here.

 

Other Kingdom Conspiracy Media:

Scot McKnight wrote “What Does Kingdom Mean?” on Jesus Creed.

David Fitch continued his review of Kingdom Conspiracy.

Matthew94 shared some highlights from Scot McKnight’s recent talk at Northeastern Seminary.

 

Brazos Press ECPA Cover Award:

iGods by Craig Detweiler won an Evangelical Christian Publishers Association Top Shelf Book Cover Award.

Congratulations to art director Paula Gibson for her input and direction on this excellent cover.

The 2014 Top Shelf Book Cover Awards were presented during a PUBu session held on October 21 at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois.

 

Quick Hits:

Jerry L. Walls, author of Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory (February 2015), was quoted in the Religion News Service article “Does purgatory have a prayer with Protestants?

Patheos blogger Ben Witherington began reviewing Can We Still Believe the Bible? by Craig Blomberg. Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 are posted.

Kevin Schut, author of Of Games and God, was interviewed for WORLD Magazine article “Virtual games, real empathy.”

The Weekly Hit List: October 24, 2014

Kingdom Conspiracy by Scot McKnight was reviewed by David Fitch.

“In Scot McKnight’s latest book, Kingdom Conspiracy,he has an axe to grind. He’s doing some honest complaining.

“The way he sees it, the word ‘Kingdom’ has become muddled. The phrase ‘Kingdom of God’ has lost its moorings. It has come to mean many different things to different people within the Christian world.

“As a result, the word ‘Kingdom’ has lost its impact. And McKnight thinks this word is too important to the Christian mission to get sloppy with.

“I think he has a righteous complaint.”

Read the entire review here.

 

Other Kingdom Conspiracy Media:

Englewood Review of Books included Kingdom Conspiracy as one their recommended new releases.

Ryan Dueck reviewed Kingdom Conspiracy.

Justin Hiebert reviewed Kingdom Conspiracy.

Jay Guin reviewed Kingdom Conspiracy.

Scott of The Prodigal Thought recommended Kingdom Conspiracy.

 

Quick Hits:

Craig Blomberg, author of Can We Still Believe the Bible?, was interviewed by Ben Witherington.

Ben Witherington also reviewed Can We Still Believe the Bible?.

Generous Spaciousness by Wendy VanderWal-Gritter was reviewed by Philip Zoutendam.

A Beautiful Disaster by Marlena Graves was mentioned by Byron Borger on Hearts & Minds Books.

The Weekly Hit List: October 17, 2014

Scot McKnight, author of Kingdom Conspiracy, was interviewed by Jonathan Merritt on his Religion News Service blog.

“Hordes of American Christians are far less committed to their local church because they are committed to doing ‘kingdom work.’ Kingdom for many means the bigger things God is doing in this world.

“A proper kingdom theology leads people to the middle of the church, not away from it. So it makes a difference when church is on the decline and people are saying they are committed to the kingdom but not so much to the church. You can’t have kingdom without church.

“What you are doing for the common good should first be done for those in your local church fellowship. Let’s start there, and we’ll have a fellowship revival worth talking about.”

Read the entire interview here.

 

Other Kingdom Conspiracy Media:

Chris Woznicki reviewed Kingdom Conspiracy.

Matthew Forrest Lowe reviewed Kingdom Conspiracy.

Robert Cornwall reviewed Kingdom Conspiracy.

Eric Miller quoted Kingdom Conspiracy.

 

Quick Hits:

The (Un)Common Good by Jim Wallis was reviewed by Conversation in Faith.

Generous Spaciousness by Wendy VanderWal-Gritter was recommended by Matthias Roberts.

The Weekly Hit List: October 10, 2014

Scot McKnight, author of Kingdom Conspiracy, was interviewed by Paul Pastor for PARSE: Ministry and Culture from Leadership Journal.

“Kingdom is misused because we all assume we know what it means. Like the word ‘gospel,’ which I examined in King Jesus Gospel, which constantly is used for ‘how to get saved’ or the ‘message that can be shaped into the plan of salvation.’ This is not how ‘gospel’ was used in the New Testament. So with the word ‘kingdom,’ which has become nearly synonymous with two different standard uses.

“For some ‘kingdom’ means acting in the public sector for the common good in order to create a world with better conditions, and for others it has come to mean little more than salvation, or what I often call ‘redemptive moments.’ If we care to shape our theology and our use of terms like “kingdom” on the basis of what the Bible says, then those two definitions are gross reductions of what the Bible says.

“Yes, of course, kingdom includes ethics (though they are not to be secularized as progressives sometimes do) and it brings redemption (as many Christians are prone to say), but those are only two aspects of a much fuller story about kingdom in the Bible. Until we get each of the elements into play we are not looking at what the Bible is saying.”

Read the entire interview here.

 

Other Kingdom Conspiracy Media:

Publishers Weekly included Kingdom Conspiracy as one of their October 2014 Religion Books of Note: “Over the past decade, McKnight has emerged as America’s theologian . . . . This is must reading for church leaders today.”

Hearts & Minds Books reviewed Kingdom Conspiracy.

Alvin Rapien reviewed Kingdom Conspiracy.

Claude Mariottini recommended Kingdom Conspiracy.

Chris Woznicki quoted Kingdom Conspiracy.

 

Quick Hits:

Dangerous Passions, Deadly Sins by Dennis Okholm was reviewed by Dr. Conrade Yap.

A Beautiful Disaster by Marlena Graves was reviewed by Aleah Marsden.

Letters to a Young Calvinist by James K. A. Smith was reviewed on Bookwi.se.

Nonviolent Action by Ronald Sider (February 2015) was mentioned by Preston Sprinkle.

Presence and Encounter by David G. Benner was quoted on Stilling Learning.

 

Ebook Specials:

Living into Focus: Choosing What Matters Most in an Age of Distraction by Arthur Boers is only $2.99 (85% off) from participating retailers through October 15.

The Weekly Hit List: October 3, 2014

Kingdom Conspiracy by Scot McKnight was reviewed by Michael Bird on Euangelion.

“In a nutshell, McKnight argues that there are two predominant views of ‘kingdom’ operating in and around evangelicalism. First, the skinny jeans view, which equates kingdom with social justice. Second, the pleated pants view, where kingdom equates to God’s redemptive work.

“McKnight wants to affirm the good of social justice work and the necessity of proclaiming salvation to the lost, but he wants to bring kingdom in closer proximity to church. . . . 

“This is a tremendously useful book. He forces people to think and re-think what kingdom is how it applies to the local church. It also dispels the view that non-Christians do ‘kingdom work’ by their philanthropic works.”

Read the entire review here.

 

Quick Hits:

Chapters 1 and 2 of Kingdom Conspiracy by Scot McKnight were reviewed by Josh Graves.

A Beautiful Disaster by Marlena Graves was quoted as a daily meditation on Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral‘s blog.

Presence and Encounter by David G. Benner was recommended by Best Books First.

 

Ebook Specials:

Eyes Wide Open: Looking for God in Popular Culture, Revised and Expanded Edition by William D. Romanowski is only $2.99 (87% off) from participating retailers through October 9.

The Weekly Hit List: September 26, 2014

Kingdom Conspiracy by Scot McKnight (October 2014) was summarized and reviewed by Trevin Wax for The Gospel Coalition.

Kingdom Conspiracy is a book that challenges some commonly held beliefs and assumptions among evangelicals. Scot McKnight will rile up people on both the left and the right, as brilliant Anabaptists always do. I’m a Baptist with a strong affinity for the Kuyperian vision, and so there were aspects of this book that resonated with me and aspects that frustrated me.

“Overall, however, Kingdom Conspiracy‘s primary goal is one that I appreciate. It offers an ecclesio-centric view of the kingdom that refocuses our attention back on the church as the centerpoint of God’s plan in our world today.”

Read the entire review here.

Read the entire summary here.

 

 

The Drama of Living by David F. Ford (October 2014) was reviewed on The Christian Century.

“A sequel to Ford’s The Shape of Living, The Drama of Living could be characterized as sapiential theology—reflection on theology that draws out its wisdom for daily living.

“Ford weaves together a mélange of sources, especially the Gospel of John and the poetry of his friend Michael O’Siadhail. A corollary to the theme of Jesus coming into the world is John’s theology of the Spirit who comes and invites us into the ongoing, improvisational drama of following Jesus and living out the love of Jesus in our lives.”

Read the entire review here.

 

Quick Hits:

Scot McKnight was interviewed about Kingdom Conspiracy on the Newsworthy with Norsworthy podcast.

Kingdom Conspiracy was recommended by Jason Micheli.

Presence and Encounter by David G. Benner was recommended by Byron Bolger on Hearts & Minds Books.

A Beautiful Disaster by Marlena Graves was reviewed by Dr. Conrade Yap

Educating All God’s Children by Nicole Baker Fulgham was reviewed by Natasha Sistrunk Robinson for Urban Faith.

The Weekly Hit List: September 19, 2014

Nicole Baker Fulgham, author of Educating All God’s Children, was interviewed by Religion News Service columnist Jonathan Merritt.

“All Christians, even those without school-aged children, have an incredible opportunity to be salt and light in our public schools. From loving and supporting teachers and administrators, to seeking out opportunities to serve under-resourced schools in our communities, each new school year brings with it countless ways to demonstrate God’s love.

“For those of us with school-aged children, public schools are often wonderful places for our kids to be exposed to students from a variety of cultures and backgrounds that prepares them to engage in an diverse and interconnected world. Far from undermining their faith, it gives them the opportunity to learn to be better neighbors, thoughtful citizens, and stronger Christians.”

Read all of “What Christian parents need to know about America’s schools” here.

 

Quick Hits:

A Beautiful Disaster by Marlena Graves was reviewed by Angela Shupe.

A Life Observed by Devin Brown was reviewed by Stan Bohall.

Wendy VanderWal-Gritter, author of Generous Spaciousness, will appear live on LifeLine (WDCX Radio) on Tuesday, September 23, from 4:00-5:00 p.m. ET.

Arthur Boers, author of Living into Focus, wrote “Too Busy to Be Faithful?” for Faith Today.

Living into Focus was quoted on Tides and Turning.

The Weekly Hit List: September 5, 2014

Kingdom Conspiracy: Returning to the Radical Mission of the Local Church (October 2014) by Scot McKnight was reviewed by Publishers Weekly.

“Over the past decade, McKnight (The Jesus Creed) has emerged as America’s theologian, a breezier, more down-home version of the British N.T. Wright. His works provide an extra layer of theological undergirding for pastors and lay people who wish to go deeper in Bible study and live more consciously under the rule of ‘King Jesus,’ as he refers to Jesus Christ.

“McKnight’s writing is vivid, occasionally a little quirky. His book is valuable because he begins with the present state of churches: divided between what he calls the ‘skinny jeans’ and ‘pleated pants’ approaches.

“The skinny-jeans types want to present everything in terms of social activism and justice—’kingdom work for the common good’—but they often miss the boat when calling people to do everything under King Jesus. The pleated-pants crowd wants to understand everything as related to personal salvation, but they too miss the larger picture of the implications for the saved life under King Jesus.

“This is a must-read for church leaders today.”

 

Quick Hits:

Can We Still Believe the Bible? by Craig Blomberg was reviewed by Towers and by Brave Reviews.

Craig Blomberg wrote “Does the Bible Ever Get it Wrong? Facing Scripture’s Difficult Passages” for Canon Fodder.

Jim Wallis, author of The (Un)Common Good, appeared on CNBCAfrica to discuss “the role of social movements in politics.”

Dangerous Passions, Deadly Sins by Dennis Okholm was reviewed by Michael Philliber.

iGods by Craig Detweiler was reviewed by Chris Altrock.

 

Ebook Specials:

Conversations with Poppi about God: An Eight-Year-Old and Her Theologian Grandfather Trade Questions by Robert W. Jenson and Solveig Lucia Gold is only $0.99 from Amazon through September 2.

 

The Weekly Hit List: August 29, 2014

Eric Metaxas recommended iGods by Craig Detweiler on BreakPoint.

“Clearly, we cannot throw our laptops, smartphones, and electronic games out the window. But we can restrict when and how our kids use them. In other words, a Luddite response is not needed. But a Christian response surely is.

“To help you get started, let me suggest a new book, ‘iGods: How Technology Shapes our Spiritual and Social Lives.’ It’s by Craig Detweiler, a communications professor at Pepperdine University. Detweiler’s book will help you begin to forge a ‘theology of technology,’ so that you can use it for good while avoiding the pitfalls.”

Read “Hey, Kid, Put Down that Tablet” here.

 

Quick Hits:

M. Daniel Carroll R., author of Christians at the Border, appeared on Connecting Faith with Neil Stavem.

A Beautiful Disaster by Marlena Graves was reviewed by Callie Glorioso-Mays.

Educating All God’s Children by Nicole Baker Fulgham was recommended by Natasha Sistrunk Robinson.

A Life Observed by Devin Brown was recommended on Middle-earth Network.

Generous Spaciousness by Wendy VanderWal-Gritter was discussed by Dr. David Fitch.

 

Ebook Specials:

Letters to a Young Calvinist: An Invitation to the Reformed Tradition by James K. A. Smith is only $2.99 (80% off) through September 2.

Can These Bones Live?: A Catholic Baptist Engagement with Ecclesiology, Hermeneutics, and Social Theory by Barry Harvey is only $1.99 (94% off) through September 4.

The Weekly Hit List: August 15, 2014

Wendy VanderWal-Gritter, author of Generous Spaciousness, was interviewed by Jonathan Merritt on his Religion News Service blog.  

“RNS: Many have argued of late that there is no middle ground and no third way on the issue of sexuality for Christians. What say you?”

“WV: If middle ground is seen as some sort of wishy-washy compromise, it is rightly judged as neither upholding deeply held convictions nor working towards the undoing of injustice and oppression. However, if a posture like generous spaciousness is recognized as the narrow path of humbly humanizing the other through intentional listening, then it shouldn’t be so easily dismissed. In a perfect world, we would be free to hold our deepest beliefs and no one would experience marginalization. We should recall our interdependence and, as Desmond Tutu says, remember that if I diminish you – then I diminish myself.”

Read the rest of “A third way for Christians on the ‘gay issue’?” here.

 

Jim Wallis, author of The (Un)Common Good, spoke with Relevant Magazine about “8 Ways to Change the World.”

“If you want to make a difference in your own community or neighborhood or world, start by looking at what’s wrong and then figuring out how to make things right.

“In particular, what most breaks your heart or offends your sense of justice? Where do you feel the pain of the world most personally and passionately? Then find the other people who feel the same pain and passion around that reality and work with them to make a difference.

“But it has to take concrete shape in real contexts and situations, not just in our heads and rhetoric. What things have gotten your attention that you think are wrong? That is how every movement for justice starts, and changing the world through justice is as simple as that.”

Read the rest of “8 Ways to Change the World” here.

 

Quick Hits:

Daniel Carroll, author of Christians at the Border, will appear on Connecting Faith with Neil Stavem for a live interview on Tuesday, August 19, at 1:00 p.m. ET.

Jim Wallis, author of The (Un)Common Good, was quoted by The Christian Post.

Generous Spaciousness by Wendy VanderWal-Gritter was reviewed by The Orphan Age.

Can We Still Believe the Bible? by Craig Blomberg was recommended by The Seedbed Blog.

The Student Creed in Learning for the Love of God by Donald Opitz and Derek Melleby was recommended by The Emerging Scholars Blog.