The Weekly Hit List: A regular round-up of all things Brazos from around the web - including reviews, interviews and other activity.

The Weekly Hit List: August 28, 2015

Cover ArtJonathan Grant’s Divine Sex was reviewed at Christianity Today.

By providing such a thoughtful, well-rounded, and compelling account of our society’s view of sex, Grant provides the resources we need to challenge, deconstruct, and ultimately subvert it. After all, if our vision of sexuality gives rise to a parade of horribles—a hypersexualized culture, sexual dissatisfaction, rampant porn use, unhappier marriages, and young men who deny, with a straight face, that sex has any mystery—then why would we keep it?

Peter Leithart, author of Traces of the Trinity, was interviewed at Books at a Glance.

The Father is in the Son but never becomes the Son; the Son is in the Father, but never becomes Father. That is part of the beauty and mystery, the fascination, of the Trinity: That three Persons are utterly united and yet utterly distinct.


Quick Hits:

Matthew Skinner wrote On Why (Some) People Don’t Give Money to Their Church for The Huffington Post, which drew from his forthcoming Intrusive God, Disruptive Gospel.

 

 

The Weekly Hit List: August 21, 2015

Cover ArtLearning for the Love of God, by Donald Opitz and Derek Melleby, was reviewed at Bob on Books.

“Having worked in the collegiate ministry world for many years, I welcome this book. It is too easy for our ministries to overlook the academic aspect of the discipleship of our students….A great gift to students headed off to college

 


Quick Hits:

J. Todd Billings, author of Rejoicing in Lament, asked Why do Cancer Patients Hide Side Effects?

Jonathan Storment, at Jesus Creed, wrestled with the question “Did Gandhi do Kingdom work?” in light of Scot McKnight’s Kingdom Conspiracy.

The Weekly Hit List: August 14, 2015

Cover ArtScot McKnight’s Kingdom Conspiracy was reviewed by Steve McAlpine at The Gospel Coalition Australia.

“If one line sums up Scot McKnight’s latest, and by some accounts most controversial, book Kingdom Conspiracy: Returning to the Radical Mission of the Local Church, it would be this:

Everything can be kingdom. And when everything is kingdom, nothing will be. (cue outraged cries)

I warmed to this book quickly. McKnight rides to the rescue of that once-incredible damsel in distress, the western church, riven as she is by assaults from without and doubts from within and gives her credibility back.”


Quick Hits:

Wesley Hill, author of Spiritual Friendship, was interviewed at Key Life.

 At Theologues, Alvin Rapien discussed politics and religion, and drew from Paul’s New Moment by John Milbank, Slavoj Zizek, and Creston Davis.

Chuck McKnight recommended Ron Sider’s Nonviolent Action in his post How Should Christians Respond to Violence? at the Faithlife Blog.

An Interview with Jonathan Grant, author of Divine Sex

Cover ArtJonathan Grant, author of Divine Sex: A Compelling Vision for Christian Relationships in a Hypersexualized Age, was recently interviewed at Life Lessons.

You can listen below.

 

 

 

 

 

The Weekly Hit List: July 31, 2015

Cover ArtJ. Todd Billings, author of Rejoicing in Lament, was interviewed on the Compassion Radio Podcast. You can listen to part 1 here, and part 2 here.

Todd Billings was living his dream. As a professor, husband and father, all of his ambitions in life were lining up. Then enters a word incongruent with his dreams – CANCER. Most men would buckle down and focus on nothing else than fighting the disease. Todd is not most men. He’s finding grace and hope in ever-increasing measure and paying it forward. In the process, he’s bringing hope and even joy to thousands. You’ll find out how, today and tomorrow.”


Quick Hits:

Kuyperian Commentary shared an excerpt from Peter Leithart’s Traces of the Trinity.

Wesley Hill’s Spiritual Friendship was reviewed at The Republic.

The Weekly Hit List: July 24, 2015

Traces of the TrinityCover Art, by Peter Leithart, was reviewed by Matthew Levering at Reformation 21.

“We cannot help but be enriched by Leithart’s magnificent vision, presented with such broad erudition and winsome prose. If, in dark moments, we wonder whether the world has really been created by the triune God, we can remember what Leithart has shown and be strengthened in faith. In its fundamental fabric, this world is exactly as Scripture’s teaching about our triune Creator would lead us to expect.”


Quick Hits:

Craig Blomberg’s Can We Still Believe the Bible? was reviewed at Brave Daily.

Wesley Hill responded to some questions raised by a recent review of Spiritual Friendship.

The Weekly Hit List: July 17, 2015

Melinda Selmys reviewed Wesley Hill’s Spiritual Friendship for Catholic Authenticity.

This book is smart and well-researched, yet also personable and approachable. Wesley’s prose stylistics are a joy to read: he is intelligent without being tedious or pedantic, and he uses his considerable knowledge of the subject matter to inform his audience without showing off.

The inclusion of his own, sometimes painful struggles to realize the kind of love that he envisions allows the reader to truly understand both what friendship is, and why we need it so badly in the church today.

 

Other Spiritual Friendship Media:

In response to a recent article by Julie Rodgers, Wesley Hill wrote an essay titled “Yes, many Christian communities are toxic for my LBGT friends. But there’s more.” for The Washington Post.

The Weekly Hit List: July 10, 2015

Cover ArtCraig Blomberg’s Can We Still Believe the Bible? was a featured reviewed at The Englewood Review of Books.

Readers who seriously engage the arguments contained in this book will discover a reflective, reasonable, and rich Christianity that does not shy away from tough questions or hard facts.

In light of the recent supreme court ruling, Comment Magazine shared an excerpt from the forthcoming Free to Serve by Stephen Monsma and Stanley Carlson-Thies.

Principled pluralism seeks public policies that are even-handed not only among the faith-based organizations of various religious traditions but also between faith-based organizations and secular organizations. Neither should be favored over the other.


Quick Hits:

Rejoicing in Lament, by J. Todd Billings, was named one of the best books of the year by Words of Grace.

Stephen Monsma, co-author of Free to Serve, discussed the Obergefell v. Hodges decision at Christianity Today.

And finally, congrats to Dr. David G. Benner whose Presence and Encounter received the silver award in the Body, Mind & Spirit category of the 2014 Foreword Reviews IndieFab Book of the Year Awards.

 

The Weekly Hit List: June 26, 2015

Traces of the TrinityCover Art, by Peter Leithart, was reviewed by Andrew Stout at The Englewood Review of Books.

The theological propositions here are bold, far-reaching, and endlessly suggestive. Leithart creatively and entertainingly illuminates the traditional concept of perichoresis at the same time that he extends the scope of its application. He deftly intertwines, philosophical, theological, and literary allusions as he articulates a vision of the world that is given shape by Scripture.

At Jesus Creed, John Frye discussed the vice of Lust, as part of his series on Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung’s Glittering Vices.

Our culture expects lust to deliver only what love can deliver. Thus, more sexual encounters build up and the more empty men and women feel. Physical pleasure, whether eating and drinking or sexual intercourse, cannot in themselves meet our spiritual needs..


Quick Hits:

Matthew H. Young, at First Things, read James K. A. Smith’s Letters to a Young Calvinist.

Jonathan Grant’s Divine Sex was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Stephen J. Bedard reviewed Nonviolent Action by Ron Sider.

The Weekly Hit List: June 19, 2015

Cover ArtJ. Todd Billings, author of Rejoicing in Lament, was interviewed by Anna at An Inch of Gray.

My book is called Rejoicing in Lament with a double-sense: taking joy in rediscovering the healing balm of biblical lament, and also rejoicing in the midst of lament. I’ve not only shed tears of grief, but tears of joy in my cancer journey. Ultimately, this is a book that shows how lament can go hand in hand with gratitude and hope.

At Jesus Creed, McKnight finished his series on Wesley Hill’s Spiritual Friendship.

Love is a genuine and rugged commitment to another person, first, to be with that person, and second, to be for that person, and third, in that context those who genuinely love journey into Christlikeness. I don’t think that can happen without friendships being formed.


Quick Hits:

Scot McKnight’s Kingdom Conspiracy was reviewed by T. D. Hurst at Where the Wild Things Are.

Stratford Caldecott‘s Beauty for Truth’s Sake was reviewed by Roy Peachey at Humanum.

At School of Religion, Vincent Williams reviewed A Public Faith by Miroslav Volf.