The Weekly Hit List: June 26, 2015

Traces of the TrinityCover Art, by Peter Leithart, was reviewed by Andrew Stout at The Englewood Review of Books.

The theological propositions here are bold, far-reaching, and endlessly suggestive. Leithart creatively and entertainingly illuminates the traditional concept of perichoresis at the same time that he extends the scope of its application. He deftly intertwines, philosophical, theological, and literary allusions as he articulates a vision of the world that is given shape by Scripture.

At Jesus Creed, John Frye discussed the vice of Lust, as part of his series on Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung’s Glittering Vices.

Our culture expects lust to deliver only what love can deliver. Thus, more sexual encounters build up and the more empty men and women feel. Physical pleasure, whether eating and drinking or sexual intercourse, cannot in themselves meet our spiritual needs..


Quick Hits:

Matthew H. Young, at First Things, read James K. A. Smith’s Letters to a Young Calvinist.

Jonathan Grant’s Divine Sex was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Stephen J. Bedard reviewed Nonviolent Action by Ron Sider.

The Weekly Hit List: March 6, 2015

J. Todd Billings, author of Rejoicing in Lament, was interviewed by Publishers Weekly.

“Billings, research professor of reformed theology at Western Theological Seminary in Holland, Mich., and an ordained minister of the Reformed Church in America, has made significant theological contributions over the years.

“Union with Christ: Reframing Theology and Ministry for the Church (Baker Academic, 2011)—his study of the basic tenet of Christian faith and its effects on social justice, mission, and observant life—won a 2012 Christianity Today Award of Merit in the Theology/Ethics category.

“But when he received the news of his terminal illness at age 39, Billings’s world was shaken, and he faced the most personally difficult theological questions of his life.”

Read the entire interview here.

 

Other Rejoicing in Lament Media:

Todd will appear live on INSIGHT (on the Miracle Channel) on Monday, March 9, at 11:00 a.m. ET.

Todd appeared on Steve Brown, Etc.

Publishers Weekly mentioned Rejoicing in Lament in “Comfort & Counsel.”

Todd appeared on Mere Fidelity podcast.

Mail Tribune mentioned Rejoicing in Lament.

Trevin Wax reviewed Rejoicing in Lament.

Steven Shaffer reviewed Rejoicing in Lament.

Christ the King recommended Rejoicing in Lament.

Chris Brauns reviewed Rejoicing in Lament.

Michael Philliber reviewed Rejoicing in Lament.

 

Quick Hits:

Jerry L. Walls, author of Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory, was interviewed by Wesley Accent.

Jerry Walls wrote “Predestination and Freedom” for Good News.

Scot McKnight, author of Kingdom Conspiracy, appeared on Seminary Dropout podcast.

Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory was mentioned by Publishers Weekly in “Is Heaven for Real?”

Divine Sex by Jonathan Grant (July 2015) was mentioned by Publishers Weekly.

Liberating Image by J. Richard Middleton was recommended by Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books.

Can We Still Believe the Bible? by Craig Blomberg was recommended by Phil Steiger and Steve Mathewson.

M. Daniel Carroll R., author of Christians at the Border, wrote “The Immigration Debate: Can the Bible Help?” for Evangelicals for Social Action.

 

Ebook Specials:

Letters to a Young Calvinist: An Invitation to the Reformed Tradition by James K. A. Smith is only $2.99 (80% off) from participating retailers through March 9.

Conversations with Poppi about God: An Eight-Year-Old and Her Theologian Grandfather Trade Questions by Robert W. Jenson and Solveig Lucia Gold is only $0.99 (84% off) from participating retailers through March 11.

Ebook Special for Letters to a Young Calvinist by James K. A. Smith

Now through March 9, the ebook of Letters to a Young Calvinist: An Invitation to the Reformed Tradition by James K. A. Smith is only $2.99 (80% off) from the following participating retailers:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

CBD

 

“In this series of epistolary exhortations, Smith addresses the faults of the Calvinist theology to which he subscribes–for example, its seeming lack of charity and production of arrogant followers. He then calls on young Calvinists to rise above haughty intellectualism to embrace the richer, more sustainable Reformed tradition that grew out of Calvinist ideas. . . . Smith welcomes readers to embrace more than just a grumpy theological debate. He opens them to a tradition defined by grace, enjoyment, and group worship. This slim introduction will leave readers wanting more history and will prepare them to dive into more challenging texts.”
Publishers Weekly

“A wise and delightfully written portrayal of a robust Calvinism for the twenty-first century.”
Richard J. Mouw, Fuller Theological Seminary

 

Who would have guessed that something as austere as Calvinism would become a hot topic in today’s postmodern culture? At the five hundredth anniversary of John Calvin’s birth, new generations have discovered and embraced a “New Calvinism” with fervor and zeal, finding in the Reformed tradition a rich theological vision. In fact, Time cited New Calvinism as one of “10 Ideas Changing the World Right Now.”

Letters to a Young Calvinist provides pastoral and theological counsel, encouraging converts to and participants in this tradition to find in Calvin a vision that’s even bigger than the New Calvinism might suggest. Noted Reformed philosopher James K. A. Smith contends that much of what traffics under the banner of New Calvinism reduces “Reformed” to a narrow concern with Calvinistic soteriology. Smith introduces New Calvinists to the “world-formative” Christianity that was unleashed with the Reformation, presenting the Reformed tradition as an Augustinian renewal movement within the church catholic. Offering wisdom at the intersection of theology and culture, he also provides pastoral caution about pride and maturity.

The creative and accessible letter format invites young Calvinists into a faithful conversation that reaches from Paul and Augustine through Calvin and Edwards to Kuyper and Wolterstorff. Together these letters sketch a comprehensive vision of Calvinism that is generous, winsome, and imaginative.

 

James K. A. Smith (PhD, Villanova University) is professor of philosophy at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he also holds the Gary and Henrietta Byker Chair in Applied Reformed Theology and Worldview. He is the editor of Comment magazine. Smith has authored or edited many books, including Imagining the Kingdom and the Christianity Today Book Award winners Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? and Desiring the Kingdom. He is also editor of the well-received The Church and Postmodern Culture series (www.churchandpomo.org).

The Weekly Hit List: October 10, 2014

Scot McKnight, author of Kingdom Conspiracy, was interviewed by Paul Pastor for PARSE: Ministry and Culture from Leadership Journal.

“Kingdom is misused because we all assume we know what it means. Like the word ‘gospel,’ which I examined in King Jesus Gospel, which constantly is used for ‘how to get saved’ or the ‘message that can be shaped into the plan of salvation.’ This is not how ‘gospel’ was used in the New Testament. So with the word ‘kingdom,’ which has become nearly synonymous with two different standard uses.

“For some ‘kingdom’ means acting in the public sector for the common good in order to create a world with better conditions, and for others it has come to mean little more than salvation, or what I often call ‘redemptive moments.’ If we care to shape our theology and our use of terms like “kingdom” on the basis of what the Bible says, then those two definitions are gross reductions of what the Bible says.

“Yes, of course, kingdom includes ethics (though they are not to be secularized as progressives sometimes do) and it brings redemption (as many Christians are prone to say), but those are only two aspects of a much fuller story about kingdom in the Bible. Until we get each of the elements into play we are not looking at what the Bible is saying.”

Read the entire interview here.

 

Other Kingdom Conspiracy Media:

Publishers Weekly included Kingdom Conspiracy as one of their October 2014 Religion Books of Note: “Over the past decade, McKnight has emerged as America’s theologian . . . . This is must reading for church leaders today.”

Hearts & Minds Books reviewed Kingdom Conspiracy.

Alvin Rapien reviewed Kingdom Conspiracy.

Claude Mariottini recommended Kingdom Conspiracy.

Chris Woznicki quoted Kingdom Conspiracy.

 

Quick Hits:

Dangerous Passions, Deadly Sins by Dennis Okholm was reviewed by Dr. Conrade Yap.

A Beautiful Disaster by Marlena Graves was reviewed by Aleah Marsden.

Letters to a Young Calvinist by James K. A. Smith was reviewed on Bookwi.se.

Nonviolent Action by Ronald Sider (February 2015) was mentioned by Preston Sprinkle.

Presence and Encounter by David G. Benner was quoted on Stilling Learning.

 

Ebook Specials:

Living into Focus: Choosing What Matters Most in an Age of Distraction by Arthur Boers is only $2.99 (85% off) from participating retailers through October 15.

The Weekly Hit List: August 29, 2014

Eric Metaxas recommended iGods by Craig Detweiler on BreakPoint.

“Clearly, we cannot throw our laptops, smartphones, and electronic games out the window. But we can restrict when and how our kids use them. In other words, a Luddite response is not needed. But a Christian response surely is.

“To help you get started, let me suggest a new book, ‘iGods: How Technology Shapes our Spiritual and Social Lives.’ It’s by Craig Detweiler, a communications professor at Pepperdine University. Detweiler’s book will help you begin to forge a ‘theology of technology,’ so that you can use it for good while avoiding the pitfalls.”

Read “Hey, Kid, Put Down that Tablet” here.

 

Quick Hits:

M. Daniel Carroll R., author of Christians at the Border, appeared on Connecting Faith with Neil Stavem.

A Beautiful Disaster by Marlena Graves was reviewed by Callie Glorioso-Mays.

Educating All God’s Children by Nicole Baker Fulgham was recommended by Natasha Sistrunk Robinson.

A Life Observed by Devin Brown was recommended on Middle-earth Network.

Generous Spaciousness by Wendy VanderWal-Gritter was discussed by Dr. David Fitch.

 

Ebook Specials:

Letters to a Young Calvinist: An Invitation to the Reformed Tradition by James K. A. Smith is only $2.99 (80% off) through September 2.

Can These Bones Live?: A Catholic Baptist Engagement with Ecclesiology, Hermeneutics, and Social Theory by Barry Harvey is only $1.99 (94% off) through September 4.

Ebook Special for Letters to a Young Calvinist by James K. A. Smith

Now through September 2, the ebook of Letters to a Young Calvinist: An Invitation to the Reformed Tradition by James K. A. Smith is only $2.99 (80% off) from the following participating retailers:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

CBD

“In this series of epistolary exhortations, Smith addresses the faults of the Calvinist theology to which he subscribes–for example, its seeming lack of charity and production of arrogant followers. He then calls on young Calvinists to rise above haughty intellectualism to embrace the richer, more sustainable Reformed tradition that grew out of Calvinist ideas. . . . Smith welcomes readers to embrace more than just a grumpy theological debate. He opens them to a tradition defined by grace, enjoyment, and group worship. This slim introduction will leave readers wanting more history and will prepare them to dive into more challenging texts.”
Publishers Weekly

“A wise and delightfully written portrayal of a robust Calvinism for the twenty-first century.”
Richard J. Mouw, Fuller Theological Seminary

Who would have guessed that something as austere as Calvinism would become a hot topic in today’s postmodern culture? At the five hundredth anniversary of John Calvin’s birth, new generations have discovered and embraced a “New Calvinism” with fervor and zeal, finding in the Reformed tradition a rich theological vision. In fact, Time cited New Calvinism as one of “10 Ideas Changing the World Right Now.”

Letters to a Young Calvinist provides pastoral and theological counsel, encouraging converts to and participants in this tradition to find in Calvin a vision that’s even bigger than the New Calvinism might suggest. Noted Reformed philosopher James K. A. Smith contends that much of what traffics under the banner of New Calvinism reduces “Reformed” to a narrow concern with Calvinistic soteriology. Smith introduces New Calvinists to the “world-formative” Christianity that was unleashed with the Reformation, presenting the Reformed tradition as an Augustinian renewal movement within the church catholic. Offering wisdom at the intersection of theology and culture, he also provides pastoral caution about pride and maturity.

The creative and accessible letter format invites young Calvinists into a faithful conversation that reaches from Paul and Augustine through Calvin and Edwards to Kuyper and Wolterstorff. Together these letters sketch a comprehensive vision of Calvinism that is generous, winsome, and imaginative.

James K. A. Smith (PhD, Villanova University) is professor of philosophy at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he also holds the Gary and Henrietta Byker Chair in Applied Reformed Theology and Worldview. He is the editor of Comment magazine. Smith has authored or edited many books, including Imagining the Kingdom and the Christianity Today Book Award winners Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? and Desiring the Kingdom. He is also editor of the well-received The Church and Postmodern Culture series (www.churchandpomo.org).

The Weekly Hit List: March 21, 2014

Five Brazos Press titles were selected as finalists in the ForeWord Reviews 2013 Book of the Year Awards.

A Life Observed: A Spiritual Biography of C. S. Lewis by Devin Brown in the Biography category
Drawing on Lewis’s autobiographical works, books by those who knew him personally, and his apologetic and fictional writing, this book tells the inspiring story of Lewis’s journey from cynical atheist to joyous Christian and challenges readers to follow their own calling. The book allows Lewis to tell his own life story in a uniquely powerful manner while shedding light on his best-known works.

 

 

Educating All God’s Children: What Christians Can—and Should—Do to Improve Public Education for Low-Income Kids by Nicole Baker Fulgham in the Education category
Education expert explores what Christians can—and should—do to champion urgently needed reform and help improve our public schools. The book provides concrete action steps for working to ensure that all of God’s children get the quality public education they deserve.

 

 

iGods: How Technology Shapes Our Spiritual and Social Lives by Craig Detweiler in the Popular Culture category
Provides needed Christian perspective on navigating today’s social media culture. Detweiler interacts with major symbols, or “iGods,” of our distracted age—Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Pixar, YouTube, and Twitter—to investigate the impact of the technologies and cultural phenomena that drive us. Detweiler offers a historic look at where we’ve been and a prophetic look at where we’re headed, helping us sort out the immediate from the eternal, the digital from the divine.

 

Of Games and God: A Christian Exploration of Video Games by Kevin Schut in the Popular Culture category
Kevin Schut, a communications expert and an enthusiastic gamer himself, offers a lively, balanced, and informed Christian evaluation of video games and video game culture. He expertly engages a variety of issues, encouraging readers to consider both the perils and the promise of this major cultural phenomenon.

 

 

On God’s Side: What Religion Forgets and Politics Hasn’t Learned about Serving the Common Good by Jim Wallis in the Religion category
Wallis explores how Jesus’s agenda can serve the common good, what it takes to sustain a lifelong commitment to social justice, and how reading the Bible as well as the culture can shape our lives for genuine transformation.

 

 

 

The complete list of the ForeWord Reviews’ 2013 Book of the Year Award Finalists is available here.

The full press release from Brazos Press is available here.

 

Can We Still Believe the Bible? Media:

Margaret Feinberg published the second of several weekly interviews with Craig Blomberg.

This week for the Can We Still Believe the Bible? blog tour, Ken Schenck responded to chapter 1, Joel L. Watts and Lee Martin McDonald responded to chapter 2, and Phillip J. Long responded to chapter 3. The remaining blog tour posts will appear next week.

Don’t miss our five-book package giveaway (worth $180), which ends next Thursday, March 27.

 

Quick Hits:

Miroslav Volf, author of A Public Faith, wrote “Exclusion or Saturation? Rethinking the Place of Religion in Public Life” for ABC Religion and Ethics.

iGods by Craig Detweiler was reviewed by Jim Kane.

Just Politics by Ronald J. Sider was recommended by Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books.

 

Ebook Specials:

Letters to a Young Calvinist: An Invitation to the Reformed Tradition by James K. A. Smith is only $2.99 (80%) off through March 27.

Ebook Special for Letters to a Young Calvinist by James K. A. Smith

Now through March 27, the ebook of Letters to a Young Calvinist: An Invitation to the Reformed Tradition by James K. A. Smith is only $2.99 (80% off) from the following participating retailers:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

CBD

 

“In this series of epistolary exhortations, Smith addresses the faults of the Calvinist theology to which he subscribes–for example, its seeming lack of charity and production of arrogant followers. He then calls on young Calvinists to rise above haughty intellectualism to embrace the richer, more sustainable Reformed tradition that grew out of Calvinist ideas. . . . Smith welcomes readers to embrace more than just a grumpy theological debate. He opens them to a tradition defined by grace, enjoyment, and group worship. This slim introduction will leave readers wanting more history and will prepare them to dive into more challenging texts.”
Publishers Weekly

“A wise and delightfully written portrayal of a robust Calvinism for the twenty-first century.”
Richard J. Mouw, Fuller Theological Seminary

Who would have guessed that something as austere as Calvinism would become a hot topic in today’s postmodern culture? At the five hundredth anniversary of John Calvin’s birth, new generations have discovered and embraced a “New Calvinism” with fervor and zeal, finding in the Reformed tradition a rich theological vision. In fact, Time cited New Calvinism as one of “10 Ideas Changing the World Right Now.”

Letters to a Young Calvinist provides pastoral and theological counsel, encouraging converts to and participants in this tradition to find in Calvin a vision that’s even bigger than the New Calvinism might suggest. Noted Reformed philosopher James K. A. Smith contends that much of what traffics under the banner of New Calvinism reduces “Reformed” to a narrow concern with Calvinistic soteriology. Smith introduces New Calvinists to the “world-formative” Christianity that was unleashed with the Reformation, presenting the Reformed tradition as an Augustinian renewal movement within the church catholic. Offering wisdom at the intersection of theology and culture, he also provides pastoral caution about pride and maturity.

The creative and accessible letter format invites young Calvinists into a faithful conversation that reaches from Paul and Augustine through Calvin and Edwards to Kuyper and Wolterstorff. Together these letters sketch a comprehensive vision of Calvinism that is generous, winsome, and imaginative.

James K. A. Smith (PhD, Villanova University) is professor of philosophy at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he also holds the Gary and Henrietta Byker Chair in Applied Reformed Theology and Worldview. He is the editor of Comment magazine. Smith has authored or edited many books, including Imagining the Kingdom and the Christianity Today Book Award winners Who’s Afraid of Postmodernism? and Desiring the Kingdom. He is also editor of the well-received The Church and Postmodern Culture series (www.churchandpomo.org).

The Weekly Hit List: August 2, 2013

Nicole Baker Fulgham, author of Educating All God’s Children, was interviewed by Rachel Held Evans. Here is an excerpt:

“What would you say is the #1 thing that Christians who aren’t directly involved in education as teachers or administrators can do to help change the disparity and achievement gap within America’s public schools?

“This might surprise you, but I think Christians can have the biggest impact by becoming vocal champions of what’s possible in low-income public schools. Our society desperately needs more advocates for public schools who deeply believe in the God-given potential of every single student. If we don’t believe this type of success is possible, we will never garner the political will to enact the hard, but necessary, reforms. If we start proclaiming this belief over and over again in our communities—and then start putting our faith into action by becoming tutors, starting public school partnerships, and contacting our local, state, and national elected officials to demand change—then we’ll have a movement!”

Read the entire interview here.

 

On God’s Side media:

Jim Wallis, author of On God’s Side, appeared on Real Time with Bill Maher on HBO.

Jim Wallis also appeared on “180 with Karl Clauson” on WYLL 1160AM Chicago.

On God’s Side by Jim Wallis was referenced by Pastor Jim Bell.

 

Quick Hits:

Of Games and God by Kevin Schut was reviewed in The Banner.

Of Games and God was also recommended by Jonathan Ryan of Geek Goes Rogue on Patheos.

Educating All God’s Children by Nicole Baker Fulgham was excerpted by Catalyst Conference.

Letters to a Young Calvinist by James K. A. Smith was reviewed by Tim Challies for American Theological Inquiry.

 

Ebook Specials:

God Hides in Plain Sight: How to See the Sacred in a Chaotic World by Dean Nelson is $3.99 (77% off) through August 3.

The Weekly Hit List: June 21, 2013

A Public Faith by Miroslav Volf was reviewed by Sarita Fowler with J. Scott Horrell for Bibliotheca Sacra.

“This work calls for a close reading but is not out of reach of most readers.

“As he envisions a harmonious world, or the need to strive for one, Volf emerges as a majestic thinker and architect for how public Christian expression can function.

“With careful reading A Public Faith will benefit anyone interested in the intersection of Christianity and other religions.”

Read the rest of the review here.

 

 

On God’s Side Media:

“All Sides with Ann Fisher” on WOSU 89.7 NPR News.

“The Post-Cynical Christian” on Sojourners

“Would Jesus Love Ayn Rand Economics?” on CosortiumNews.com

 

Quick Hits:

Educating All God’s Children by Nicole Baker Fulgham was recommended by Sojourners.

A Hobbit Journey by Matthew Dickerson was reviewed by Sian Williams.

The Evolution of Adam by Peter Enns was reviewed by Matthew Vaughan for Christian Scholar’s Review.

Letters to a Young Calvinist by James K. A. Smith was reviewed by Thomas Creedy.

Letters to a Young Calvinis was also recommended by David G. Moore on Jesus Creed.

 

Ebook Specials and Other Offers:

June ebook specials are currently running for multiple Brazos Press and Baker Academic titles. All of these are at least 60% off.

Reclaiming the Body by Joel Shuman and Brian Volck M.D.
From Homer to Harry Potter by Matthew Dickerson and David O’Hara
Conversations with Poppi about God by Robert W. Jenson and Solveig Lucia Gold
Understanding Paul by Stephen Westerholm
What Christians Believe about the Bible 
by Don Thorsen and Keith Reeves