The Weekly Hit List: June 26, 2015

Traces of the TrinityCover Art, by Peter Leithart, was reviewed by Andrew Stout at The Englewood Review of Books.

The theological propositions here are bold, far-reaching, and endlessly suggestive. Leithart creatively and entertainingly illuminates the traditional concept of perichoresis at the same time that he extends the scope of its application. He deftly intertwines, philosophical, theological, and literary allusions as he articulates a vision of the world that is given shape by Scripture.

At Jesus Creed, John Frye discussed the vice of Lust, as part of his series on Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung’s Glittering Vices.

Our culture expects lust to deliver only what love can deliver. Thus, more sexual encounters build up and the more empty men and women feel. Physical pleasure, whether eating and drinking or sexual intercourse, cannot in themselves meet our spiritual needs..


Quick Hits:

Matthew H. Young, at First Things, read James K. A. Smith’s Letters to a Young Calvinist.

Jonathan Grant’s Divine Sex was reviewed by Conrade Yap at Panorama of a Book Saint.

Stephen J. Bedard reviewed Nonviolent Action by Ron Sider.

The Weekly Hit List: June 12, 2015

Cover ArtScot McKnight, at Jesus Creed, continued his series on Wesley Hill’s Spiritual Friendship.

One of the marks of “friendship” in our world is that they are the “freest, the least constrained, the least fixed and determined, of all human loves.” This from Wesley Hill, Spiritual Friendship, xiii, and a theme throughout his book.

A theme, in fact, that is seriously challenged by a proposal that Wes Hill offers, namely, that friendships ought perhaps to be more formally framed.

Other Spiritual Friendship Media:

Tim Challies reviewed Spiritual Friendship.

Spiritual Friendship was reviewed at Bob on Books.


Quick Hits:

Nonviolent Action by Ron Sider was reviewed at Panorama of a Book Saint.

A Vice Worth Pondering?” John Frye discusses avarice after reading Glittering Vices by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung.

 

The Weekly Hit List: May 29, 2015

“Bigger than Cancer: In the Darkness, a Theologian Meets God in a New Way” by J. Todd Billings, author of Rejoicing in Lament, appeared on RCA.org.

Right now, our lives are “hidden with Christ in God” (Colossians 3:3). We shouldn’t expect our lives right now to look like a seamless story of victory and success. We may die a death that looks senseless. For our true lives are hidden from sight, for now.

But “when Christ who is your life is revealed, then you also will be revealed with him in glory” (Colossians 3:4). In the meantime, we are freed to wrestle with God in our suffering and also rejoice in his unshakeable love in Christ, for this is our most basic identity: that we belong in body and soul, in life and in death, to our faithful savior, Jesus Christ.

Read the rest of “Bigger than Cancer” here.

 

Other Rejoicing in Lament Media:

WORLD Magazine recommended Rejoicing in Lament.

California Bookwatch reviewed Rejoicing in Lament.

Julie Golden reviewed Rejoicing in Lament.

Matthew Manry quoted and recommended Rejoicing in Lament.

Chris Ho reviewed Rejoicing in Lament.

 

 

Conciliar Post interviewed Wesley Hill: “The Positive Vocation of Celibacy: An Interview with Dr. Wesley Hill”

George Aldhizer: Your first book, Washed and Waiting, emphasized your struggle of living a celibate life. Spiritual Friendship emphasizes your hope and calling in living a celibate life. Does this contrast reflect an evolution in your thinking on your own sexual identity?

Wesley Hill: I think it does, yes. Washed and Waiting was more focused on what those of us who are gay are called to abstain from and how painful that can be. Spiritual Friendship is more focused on the “yes” of Christian discipleship for gay believers—what we called to pursue, positively.

The earlier book was more interested in painting a picture of the challenges and difficulties of being gay and Christian, while the latter is more interested in the question of vocation and calling. As Paul Evdokimov has put it, “[I]n all the cases of deprivation Scripture speaks of, grace offers a gift; out of a negative renunciation it creates a positive vocation. To renounce one thing means to be totally consecrated to another that this very renunciation allows us to realize.”

It’s the consecration that I’m more interested in now.

Read the entire interview here.

 

Other Spiritual Friendship Media:

Wesley Hill’s interview with Peter Smith for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette was picked up by Salina Journal and Valley News.

Seth Crocker recommended Spiritual Friendship.

Elliot Ritzema reviewed Spiritual Friendship

 

Quick Hits:

Scot McKnight, author of Kingdom Conspiracy, was interviewed by Jonathan Merritt for Religion News Service: “Who are ‘the least of these’? Scholars say they may not be the poor.” The article was picked up by The Salt Lake Tribune and The Washington Post.

Traces of the Trinity by Peter J. Leithart was recommended and excerpted by Books at a Glance and reviewed by Nick Norelli.

Of Games and God by Kevin Schut was recommended by Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books.

Marlena Graves, author of A Beautiful Disaster, wrote  “Remembering the Gospel with Alzheimer’s” for Her.meneutics.

Scot  McKnight continued discussing Glittering Vices by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung on Jesus Creed.

The Weekly Hit List: May 22, 2015

Jonathan Merritt interviewed J. Todd Billings, author of Rejoicing in Lament, for Religion News Service blog On Faith & Culture.

In a classroom in Holland, Michigan, a 39-year-old man in a bowtie stands to deliver a lecture. Peeking out from behind his glasses, he surveys the eager students who have come expecting a lecture on theology. Instead, he tells them that he has just been diagnosed with a rare and incurable cancer.

J. Todd Billings is the Gordon H. Girod research professor of Reformed theology at Western Theological Seminary and author of several award-winning books such as The Word of God for The People of God and Union With Christ. After being diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2012, Billings and his wife decided to be open with others about his condition. But they didn’t know what they would learn through the process.

The knowledge that he faces a “narrowed future” has raised fresh theological questions about life, death, and faith for Billings and taught him how to rejoice in the face of possible death. He has recorded his thoughts in a critically-acclaimed book, Rejoicing in Lament: Wrestling With Incurable Cancer and Life With Christ. Here we discuss what he has learned and hopes to teach others in the time he has left.

Read all of “Prominent theologian finds joy amid incurable cancer diagnosis” here.

 

Spiritual Friendship (Wesley Hill) Media:

Wesley Hill’s interview with Peter Smith for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette was picked up by LaCrosse Tribune and by My San Antonio.

James Matichuk reviewed Spiritual Friendship and gave it five stars.

 

Quick Hits:

On Word on Fire, Robert Barron announced his 2 Samuel contribution to the Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible series, and he shared the entire introduction to his commentary.

Scot McKnight, author of Kingdom Conspiracy, appeared on White Horse Inn.

Rejoicing in Lament was recommended by Liberti Church: “This book on lament, hope, and prayer is both deeply personal and profoundly theological.”

Dennis Okholm, author of Dangerous Passions, Deadly Sins, was interviewed on Jesus Creed blog.

Learning for the Love of God by Donald Opitz and Derek Melleby was recommended by Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books.

Scot  McKnight began discussing Glittering Vices by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung on Jesus Creed.

The Weekly Hit List: July 25, 2014

Craig Detweiler, author of iGods, appeared on C-SPAN 2’s Book TV.

The interview was conducted at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California, and was part of Book TV’s College Series. 

 

Quick Hits:

Craig Detweiler, author of iGods, wrote “Smiling for ‘Auschwitz selfies,’ and crying into the digital wilderness” for CNN’s Belief Blog.

Christians at the Border by M. Daniel Carroll R. was mentioned by Publishers Weekly.

Marlena Graves, author of A Beautiful Disaster, was interviewed by Ann Swindell.

A Beautiful Disaster was reviewed on Life in Slow Motion.

Educating All God’s Children by Nicole Baker Fulgham was recommended by Evangelicals for Social Action.

Can We Still Believe the Bible? by Craig Blomberg was referenced on The Pathway and recommended by Natasha Crain.

A Peaceable Psychology by Alvin Dueck and Kevin Reimer was reviewed by Abram Kielsmeier-Jones.

Esther & Daniel (BTCB) by Samuel Wells and George Sumner was reviewed on Examiner.com.

 

Ebook Specials:

Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung is only $1.99 (89% off) from participating retailers through July 28.

Ebook Special for Glittering Vices by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung

Now through July 28, the ebook of Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung is only $1.99 (89% off) from the following participating retailers:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

CBD

Winner of a C. S. Lewis Book Prize

“A serious, scripturally based revisitation of the perils conservative Christians face from the traditional deadly sins. . . . Suitable for many [collections].”
Library Journal

“Christian readers and readers of other deistic faiths will benefit from the reminder that a divinity is offended by those who act in loveless and other destructive ways; agnostic and atheist readers will be edified by this exhaustive compendium of the ways in which ‘vice’ is glorified and even celebrated in media, literature, and contemporary life.”
ForeWord

Glittering Vices is a felicitous blend of the scholarly and the hortatory. DeYoung is too sophisticated–and too much of a Thomist–to reduce sin to sociology or therapy. . . . This book is full of subtlety. DeYoung is very good at explaining why ‘deadly’ sins are not always the sins that threaten violence and danger.”
Commonweal

“Moral formation” and “character development” are popular buzzwords, but they are ineffective concepts without an understanding of what good character is and how to cultivate it. The traditional teachings on the “seven deadly sins,” or capital vices, compiled by saints such as Augustine, Pope Gregory I, and Aquinas, offer a strong foundation for recognizing virtues to cultivate and vices to avoid.

Unfortunately, contemporary culture trivializes, psychologizes, or even dismisses the seven vices as if they have no serious moral or spiritual implications. Glittering Vices clears that misconception with a brief history of the vices and an informative chapter on each “deadly sin.” Readers gain practical understanding of how the vices shape our culture and why gluttony, lust, sloth, and others are, in fact, incredibly destructive. Through this eye-opening book, readers will be able to correctly identify and eliminate the deeply rooted patterns of sin that are work in their lives.

Winsome and wise, Glittering Vices is intriguing for any reader interested in spiritual disciplines and character formation. Its rich content makes it useful in undergraduate and seminary ethics courses as well.

The Weekly Hit List: March 14, 2014

Can We Still Believe the Bible? by Craig Blomberg was reviewed by Christianity Today.

“Over decades toiling away in the weeds of biblical scholarship, Denver Seminary’s Blomberg has seen fashionable theories and methodologies come and go. None of them has dented his confidence that Scripture is the revealed Word of God. In fact, that confidence has been fortified.”

Read the rest of the review here.

 

Margaret Feinberg published the first of several weekly interviews with Craig Blomberg. She also recommended Can We Still Believe the Bible? as one of her “Best resources for this week’s reading.”

Can We Still Believe the Bible? was reviewed and recommended by Dr. David B. Capes.

 

Quick Hits:

Daniel Taylor, author of Creating a Spiritual Legacy, appear on My Faith Radio program Connecting Faith.

Glittering Vices by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung was reviewed by John Frye on Jesus Creed: part 1 and part 2.

A Public Faith by Miroslav Volf was reviewed by Ethos.

Learning for the Love of God by Donald Opitz and Derek Melleby was reviewed by Dr. Conrade Yap.

The Weekly Hit List: February 14, 2014

iGods by Craig Detweiler was reviewed by Englewood Review of Books.

“As the dust continues to settle in the Information Age and we further acquiesce our lives to ever-evolving technologies, Detweiler presents an astute perspective that dually avoids blind embrace as well as stubborn discount of today’s most important technologies. . . .

“Hopefully, Craig Detweiler encourages others to continue the push and pull and give and take necessary to sustain this ever-changing dialogue regarding an ever-evolving world, and will force each of us to pause in the midst of our technologically obsessed days to reflect on the presence of God in every moment amidst whatever technology we may find ourselves utilizing.”

Read the rest of the review here.

 

 

Quick Hits:

iGods by Craig Detweiler was reviewed by Dr. Conrade Yap.

Videoof Educating All God’s Children author Nicole Baker Fulgham’s talk at Calvin College’s The January Series is now available.

Nicole Baker Fulgham will be speaking next weekend, February 21-22, at The Justice Conference.

The Bible Made Impossible by Christian Smith was quoted by pastor Paul VanderKlay.

 

Ebook Specials:

iGods: How Technology Shapes Our Spiritual and Social Lives by Craig Detweiler is only $8.99 (50% off) through February 15.

Singled Out: Why Celibacy Must Be Reinvented in Today’s Church by Christine A. Colón and Bonnie E. Field is only $2.99 (80% off) through February 15.

Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung is only $2.99 (83% off) through February 20.

 

Ebook Special for Glittering Vices by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung

Now through February 20, the ebook of Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung is only $2.99 (83% off) from the following participating retailers:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

CBD

 

Winner of a C. S. Lewis Book Prize

“A serious, scripturally based revisitation of the perils conservative Christians face from the traditional deadly sins. . . . Suitable for many [collections].”
Library Journal

“Christian readers and readers of other deistic faiths will benefit from the reminder that a divinity is offended by those who act in loveless and other destructive ways; agnostic and atheist readers will be edified by this exhaustive compendium of the ways in which ‘vice’ is glorified and even celebrated in media, literature, and contemporary life.”
ForeWord

Glittering Vices is a felicitous blend of the scholarly and the hortatory. DeYoung is too sophisticated–and too much of a Thomist–to reduce sin to sociology or therapy. . . . This book is full of subtlety. DeYoung is very good at explaining why ‘deadly’ sins are not always the sins that threaten violence and danger.”
Commonweal

“Moral formation” and “character development” are popular buzzwords, but they are ineffective concepts without an understanding of what good character is and how to cultivate it. The traditional teachings on the “seven deadly sins,” or capital vices, compiled by saints such as Augustine, Pope Gregory I, and Aquinas, offer a strong foundation for recognizing virtues to cultivate and vices to avoid.

Unfortunately, contemporary culture trivializes, psychologizes, or even dismisses the seven vices as if they have no serious moral or spiritual implications. Glittering Vices clears that misconception with a brief history of the vices and an informative chapter on each “deadly sin.” Readers gain practical understanding of how the vices shape our culture and why gluttony, lust, sloth, and others are, in fact, incredibly destructive. Through this eye-opening book, readers will be able to correctly identify and eliminate the deeply rooted patterns of sin that are work in their lives.

Winsome and wise, Glittering Vices is intriguing for any reader interested in spiritual disciplines and character formation. Its rich content makes it useful in undergraduate and seminary ethics courses as well.

The Weekly Hit List: January 24, 2014

Hearts & Minds Books named On God’s Side by Jim Wallis the “Best Book for the Common Good” of 2013.

“I think this one is a splendid example of a third voice between the so called religious right and secular left.

“Here he has given us his best book in years, and an important set of considerations for citizens who have long worked for the common good, and a great starter book for anyone beginning to read for the first time about evangelical faith and public life.

“I really love much about this, and very sincerely want to honor it.”

Read the rest here.

 

 

 

Quick Hits:

Living into Focus by Arthur Boers was reviewed by Joshua Reich.

CRC News and Views wrote about Kevin Schut, author of Of Games and God, in “Seeking God in Video Games.”

Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, author of Glittering Vices, wrote New Life in the Desert: Monastic Wisdom for Public Life” for Comment magazine.

 

Ebook Specials:

Monk Habits for Everyday People: Benedictine Spirituality for Protestants by Dennis Okholm is only $2.99 (81% off) from participating retailers through January 25.