The Weekly Hit List: May 20, 2016

Cover ArtBethany Hanke Hoang was interviewed about The Justice Calling on Equipped with Chris Brooks.

“As we look at the evil in the world, we may be tempted to toss up our hands in despair and ask ‘Is it even worth trying to make a difference for good?’ Guest host Susie Larson will talk with author and speaker Bethany Hoang. They will remind us of the One who is the source of justice and who calls us to join Him in His victorious work in the world!”

Andrew Wilson reviewed James K. A. Smith’s You Are What You Love.

You Are What You Love is a wonderful book: rich, readable, searching, provocative, theological, practical. For a book on how to live the Christian life well, it has remarkable depth; for a book on worship and character formation, it has remarkable bounce. I highly recommend it.”


Quick Hits:

At Godspace, Christine Sine reflected on Lisa Graham McMinn’s To The Table, and share the excerpt “Every Meal Holds the Hope of Life“.

J. Todd Billings, author of Rejoicing in Lament, reviewed When Breath Becomes Air for Christianity Today.

Spiritual Friendship, by Wesley Hill, was featured in the Christian Century’s Take & Read.

First Things will be hosting a book talk and reception with theologian and pastor Victor Lee Austin, author of Losing Susan.

 

The Weekly Hit List: March 18, 2016

Miroslav Volf, author of A Public Faith and the forthcoming Public Faith in Action, joined David Brooks for a conversation about human flourishing.

Brazos Press is pleased to announce we are working with Karen Swallow Prior on a forthcoming book. Releasing in early 2018, Prior’s book will model the exercise of virtue through the reading of classic works of literature, works that navigate the universal themes that inform and shape human life in all its moments, both bright and dark.

Quick Hits:

At RogerEbert.com, David Roark’s discussion of Terrence Malick drew on James K.A. Smith’s concept of “cultural liturgies” in books like You Are What You Love.

Bryan at The Happy Alternative reviewed Wesley Hill’s Spiritual Friendship.

Moroslav Volf’s A Public Faith was reviewed at BLOGEGESIS.

Jim Wallis, author of America’s Original Sin, was part of the conversation What’s Happening to “Value Voters?” at To The Point on KCRW.

The Weekly Hit List: January 8, 2016

Cover ArtWesley Hill’s Spiritual Friendship was featured in The 2015 Christ and Pop Culture 25.

“Raises the possibility of deeper friendships being not just as a bulwark against corrosive individualism or a solution to the “problem” of gay Christians, but also a rich font of spiritual blessing for everyone. This short book is desperately needed in our cultural context, raising questions we shouldn’t keep to ourselves.”

Publishers Weekly reviewed The Justice Calling, coming soon from Bethany Hanke Hoang and Kristen Deede Johnson.

“Powerful insights, based in scripture and Christian teaching, to help Christians to live out Jesus’ teachings in a globalized, interconnected, but impersonal world.”

Quick Hits:

Rejoicing in Lament, by J. Todd Billings, was a book of the year at Pilgrim in Progress and The Fidelity Essays, and was recommended at Scrawlings & Ramblings.

Ellen Charry’s Psalms 1- 50 was reviewed at SirReadaLot.

James K. A. Smith, author of the forthcoming You Are What You Love, was interviewed Thursday on The Ride Home with John & Kathy. You can find the podcast here, starting at the 1:12:00 mark.

The Weekly Hit List: December 18, 2015

 Cover ArtWe are very pleased to announce that Wesley Hill’s Spiritual Friendship received an Award of Merit in the Beautiful Orthodoxy category of the Christianity Today Book Awards.

The book makes an acute diagnosis of our atomized lives in a world that imagines sex as the only source of real intimacy, and marriage as the only setting for real commitment. It retrieves elements of the historic church tradition relating to friendship and commitment. And all this is presented in sensitive, evocative language, with a reverence for literature, language, and art that makes it a delight to read. Hill’s account has a raw, even wrenching, honesty that’s essential to authentic Christian testimony in our broken world. —Andy Crouch

Wes wrote a brief response here.

To have the flagship magazine of evangelical Christianity turning its attention to the beauty and power of relationships other than romantic ones, and turning its attention thereby to the actual lived experience of celibate, gay people — well, let’s just say it feels not only like a professional honor but also like a deeply, deeply personal one.

Also, our congratulations Stephen Monsma and Stanley Carlson-Thies, whose Free to Serve won an Award of Merit in Politics and Public Life, and to Jonathan Grant, whose Divine Sex tied in Christian Living/Discipleship.

“The church’s response to the seemingly limitless trajectory of hypersexualization has been puny, negative, and ineffective…Divine Sex properly widens the frame, delivering an incisive and nearly comprehensive analysis of our present state”

“Religious liberty desperately needs defending as a matter of public policy, and Free to Serve shows how it’s done.”


Quick Hits:

Todd Wilson reviewed Scot McKnight’s Kingdom Conspiracy at Books at a Glance.

Rejoicing in Lament, by J. Todd Billings, was recommended at Pastoral Backstory.

Matthew Skinner, author of Intrusive God, Disruptive Gospel, wrote Learning from Mary in Our Age of Endless War for Odyssey Networks.

The Weekly Hit List: October 9, 2015

Cover ArtRejoicing in Lament, by J. Todd Billings, was reviewed by Don McKim at The Presbyterian Outlook

By all means, read this book. It speaks to a range of Christians — caretakers, counselors and those experiencing cancer or loss. It witnesses to faith in the midst of deep lament.


Quick Hits:

Roger Olson continued his series on Kingdom Conspiracy by Scot McKnight.

Wesley Hill, author of Spiritual Friendship, discussed what happens When Friendships Fail.

 

 

The Weekly Hit List: October 2, 2015

Cover ArtAt Acts and More, Steve Walton shared a review of Matthew Skinner’s Intrusive God, Disruptive Gospel.

This book will be eminently helpful to a church Bible study group working through Acts. It will also inform and help preachers or teachers engaging with Acts, and students who want to see ways in which the book’s themes and issues relate to Christian life and experience today. I commend it very warmly.

Spiritual Friendship, by Wesley Hill, was a featured review at The Englewood Review of Books.

Wesley Hill’s spectacular new book, Spiritual Friendship, explores one way gay Christians—especially those who embrace the traditional teaching of the church—are a gift to the church….Spiritual Friendship displays Hill’s considerable intellect, pulls from an astonishing variety of sources, and inspires with its beautiful prose.


Quick Hits:

The Institutional Religious Freedom Alliance announced the forthcoming Free to Serve, from Stephen Monsma and Stanley Carlson-Thies.

Monsma and Carlson-Thies were interviewed about Free to Serve in the latest issue of Christianity Today.

The Christian Examiner reviewed Intrusive God, Disruptive Gospel.

 

 

The Weekly Hit List: August 14, 2015

Cover ArtScot McKnight’s Kingdom Conspiracy was reviewed by Steve McAlpine at The Gospel Coalition Australia.

“If one line sums up Scot McKnight’s latest, and by some accounts most controversial, book Kingdom Conspiracy: Returning to the Radical Mission of the Local Church, it would be this:

Everything can be kingdom. And when everything is kingdom, nothing will be. (cue outraged cries)

I warmed to this book quickly. McKnight rides to the rescue of that once-incredible damsel in distress, the western church, riven as she is by assaults from without and doubts from within and gives her credibility back.”


Quick Hits:

Wesley Hill, author of Spiritual Friendship, was interviewed at Key Life.

 At Theologues, Alvin Rapien discussed politics and religion, and drew from Paul’s New Moment by John Milbank, Slavoj Zizek, and Creston Davis.

Chuck McKnight recommended Ron Sider’s Nonviolent Action in his post How Should Christians Respond to Violence? at the Faithlife Blog.

The Weekly Hit List: July 31, 2015

Cover ArtJ. Todd Billings, author of Rejoicing in Lament, was interviewed on the Compassion Radio Podcast. You can listen to part 1 here, and part 2 here.

Todd Billings was living his dream. As a professor, husband and father, all of his ambitions in life were lining up. Then enters a word incongruent with his dreams – CANCER. Most men would buckle down and focus on nothing else than fighting the disease. Todd is not most men. He’s finding grace and hope in ever-increasing measure and paying it forward. In the process, he’s bringing hope and even joy to thousands. You’ll find out how, today and tomorrow.”


Quick Hits:

Kuyperian Commentary shared an excerpt from Peter Leithart’s Traces of the Trinity.

Wesley Hill’s Spiritual Friendship was reviewed at The Republic.

The Weekly Hit List: July 24, 2015

Traces of the TrinityCover Art, by Peter Leithart, was reviewed by Matthew Levering at Reformation 21.

“We cannot help but be enriched by Leithart’s magnificent vision, presented with such broad erudition and winsome prose. If, in dark moments, we wonder whether the world has really been created by the triune God, we can remember what Leithart has shown and be strengthened in faith. In its fundamental fabric, this world is exactly as Scripture’s teaching about our triune Creator would lead us to expect.”


Quick Hits:

Craig Blomberg’s Can We Still Believe the Bible? was reviewed at Brave Daily.

Wesley Hill responded to some questions raised by a recent review of Spiritual Friendship.

The Weekly Hit List: July 17, 2015

Melinda Selmys reviewed Wesley Hill’s Spiritual Friendship for Catholic Authenticity.

This book is smart and well-researched, yet also personable and approachable. Wesley’s prose stylistics are a joy to read: he is intelligent without being tedious or pedantic, and he uses his considerable knowledge of the subject matter to inform his audience without showing off.

The inclusion of his own, sometimes painful struggles to realize the kind of love that he envisions allows the reader to truly understand both what friendship is, and why we need it so badly in the church today.

 

Other Spiritual Friendship Media:

In response to a recent article by Julie Rodgers, Wesley Hill wrote an essay titled “Yes, many Christian communities are toxic for my LBGT friends. But there’s more.” for The Washington Post.