The Weekly Hit List: December 5, 2014

Scot McKnight, author of Kingdom Conspiracy, answered readers’ questions on Rachel Held Evans’ blog.

“Let’s agree that evangelicalism is almost uncontainable in a definition. But we can give a ballpark generic-package, lump-into-one-ball idea: evangelicalism affirms the necessity of personal faith in Jesus as Lord and Savior; it affirms the primacy of Scripture in forming beliefs and convictions; it affirms the centrality of Jesus’ life, death, burial, resurrection and rule.

“Yet evangelicalism transcends its core beliefs and has a history of its people and that means there’s some sociology or social description in this term so that it refers to America’s Calvinist and revivalist and holiness and Anabaptist impulses. Some are very evangelical and some are barely.”

Read the entire post here.

 

Other Kingdom Conspiracy Media:

Scot McKnight wrote “Kingdom: A Proposal,” “The Biggest Mistake in Kingdom Talk,” and “The Character of the King” on Jesus Creed.

Missio Alliance discussed and recommended Kingdom Conspiracy.

Joshua Reich recommended Kingdom Conspiracy.

 

 

J. Todd Billings, author of Rejoicing in Lament (February 2015), wrote “Deadly Healing Medicine” for Christianity Today‘s The Behemoth.

“Incurable cancer.

“I could hardly believe it when I heard the diagnosis. My wife and I had just celebrated our tenth anniversary, and our lives were spinning in joyful commotion with one- and three- year-olds at home. Initial testing brought back some worrying results. I had researched the possibilities, and I didn’t sound like a likely prospect for this cancer.

“The average diagnosis age is about 70; I had just turned 39. But here it was: an active cancer that had already been eroding the bones in my skull, arm, and hip.”

Read the entire article here.

 

Other Rejoicing in Lament Media:

Billings wrote “Undying Love” for the December 2014 issue of First Things.

Aimee Byrd recommended Rejoicing in Lament.

 

 

Dangerous Passions, Deadly Sins by Dennis Okholm was reviewed by Englewood Review of Books.

“[Dangerous Passions, Deadly Sins] earns its spot as a highly useful tool for understanding sin in our own lives, and in our culture.  In a tone that is gentle but frank, it’s full of useful observations and counsel, from both the ancients and the moderns.

“Okholm delves into the monks’ focus on concepts such as the importance of habits – habits for good and habits that degenerate into sin, or, seeing sin in the context of community and its counterproductive privatizing impact. There’s a strong pastoral and devotional impact to this volume, and while it’s aimed at Christians who assume that sin is essential to address, a great deal will be useful to all students of the soul.”

Read the entire review here.

Dangerous Passions, Deadly Sins was also reviewed by Philip Zoutendam.

 

Quick Hits:

Craig Detweiler, author of iGods, was interviewed by WORLD magazine’s Warren Cole Smith for Listening In.

Generous Spaciousness by Wendy VanderWal-Gritter was reviewed by Evangelicals for Social Action.

Presence and Encounter by David G. Benner, PhD, was reviewed by Leader Kick.

The Bible Made Impossible by Christian Smith was reviewed on Wineskins.

Marlena Graves, author of A Beautiful Disaster, was interviewed on Inside Out.

A Beautiful Disaster was recommended by Suzanne BurdenDorothy Greco, and Mark Votava.

 

Ebook Specials:

Every volume in the Ancient-Future Bible Study: Experience Scripture through Lectio Divina series by Stephen J. Binz is only $0.99 (92% off) from participating retailers through December 31.

The Truth Shall Make You Odd: Speaking with Pastoral Integrity in Awkward Situations by Frank G. Honeycutt is only $1.99 (90% off) from participating retailers through December 31.

The Weekly Hit List: February 1, 2013

Speaking of DyingSpeaking of Dying by Fred Craddock, Dale Goldsmith, and Joy V. Goldsmith was chosen by the Academy of Parish Clergy as one of their Top 10 Books of the Year.

This book offers a critical analysis of the church’s failure to communicate constructively about dying, reminding the church of its considerable liturgical, scriptural, and pastoral resources when it ministers to the terminally ill. The authors, who have all been personally and professionally involved in end-of-life issues, suggest practical, theological bases for speaking about dying, communicating with those facing death, and preaching about dying.

They explore how dying–in baptism–begins and informs the Christian’s life story. They also emphasize that the narrative of faith embraces dying, and they remind readers of scriptural and christological resources that can lead toward a “good dying.” In addition, they present current best practices from health professionals for communication among caregivers and those facing death.

 

Quick Hits:

A Hobbit Journey by Matthew Dickerson was chosen as the “Most Timely Re-Issue” of 2012 by Hearts & Minds Books“What is so interesting about this is how seamlessly Dickerson weaves together contemporary social ethics — from justice issues to questions about the body — and the Tolkien narratives.”

Just Politics by Ronald J. Sider was chosen the “Most Needed Re-Issue” of 2012 by Hearts & Minds Books“I think everyone who votes should read this book! Just Politics is one of the year’s best.”

Soulful Spirituality by David Benner was recommended by Steve Saccone.

The Evolution of Adam by Peter Enns was recommended by Matthew Barrett on Credo.com.

 

February Ebook Specials:

During the month of February, several ebooks from Brazos Press & Baker Academic are on sale.

Click on book covers for more information on that title.

For a list of places to purchase the ebooks, visit www.brazospress.com/ebookspecials

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The Weekly Hit List: December 21, 2012

PeterStephen J. Binz, author of the Ancient-Future Bible Study series, was interviewed by Fr. Dwight Longenecker.

Here is an excerpt:

“‘Ancient-Future’ expresses the connection between ancient wisdom and future possibilities that I want to create in this series. The term is used in the arts to emphasize a blending of tradition and innovation.

“Ancient-future music and dance fuses centuries-old traditions with contemporary genres and technology. By learning from the world’s great traditions and ancient practices, artists create cross-cultural expressions that are richly profound yet also widely appealing.

“In this series, I combine the ancient art of lectio divina with contemporary Bible study to produce work that is richly traditional and attractively engaging.”

Read the rest of the review and interview here.

 

Quick Hits:

Gary L. Colledge, author of God and Charles Dickens, was interviewed in a CBN News article, “God and Scrooge: Finding the Faith of Charles Dickens.” Video can be seen here, starting at 18:23.

Matthew Dickerson was interviewed on Faith Radio Mornings about A Hobbit Journey.

A Hobbit Journey was included in an article by Publishers Weekly: “The Souls of Hobbits: New Books Unearth Tolkien’s Christian Themes.”

A Hobbit Journey was also included in an article on Busted Halo: “Of God, Tolkien, and Hobbits.”

Darkness Is My Only Companion by Kathryn Greene-McCreight was recommended by Kyle Roberts on the Cultivare blog.

 

Ebook Specials and Other Offers:

December ebook specials are currently running for multiple Brazos Press and Baker Academic titles. All of these are at least 60% off.

The Virtuous Reader by Richard S. Briggs
Healing in the Bible by Frederick J. Gaiser
1 & 2 Kings (BTCB) by Peter J. Leithart
Broken Hallelujahs by Christian Scharen
Claiming Abraham by Michael Lodahl
Where Mortals Dwell by Craig G. Bartholomew
The Forgotten Ways Handbook by Alan Hirsch with Darryn Altclass
The Vampire Defanged by Susannah Clements
Adventures in Daily Prayer by Bert Ghezzi
Seven Deadly Spirits by T. Scott Daniels

Lenten Season Lectio Divina Series: Paul

This is the sixth and final entry in our Lenten series of posts taken from Stephen Binz’s Ancient-Future Bible Study: Experience Scripture through Lectio Divina See our previous entries:

Week One: Abraham: “Ancestor of All”

Week Two:  David: “The Shepherd Who Is Also King”

Week Three:  Sarah: “Listen to Sarah, the Quarry of Encouragement”

Week Four: Peter: “From Crumbled Failure to Rock of Strength”

Week Five: Pilate’s Wife: “A Forgotten Advocate for Jesus”

Be sure to check out our videos that further explain this terrific series.

This week, we are posting a study from the introduction to Binz’s volume Paul: Apostle to All the Nations.

Crossing Boundaries and Removing Barriers

Lectio

Read this verse, which summarizes the heart of Paul’s teaching, as if he were addressing you directly. Expect these words to impact your mind and heart in a way that can transform your life.

2 Corinthians 5:17
So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new!

Continue listening to God’s Word as you also listen for the ways this Scripture passage has transformed God’s church.

The heart of Paul’s teaching is the experience of union with Christ. We live in Christ; Christ lives in us. We are united with Christ through faith in his saving cross and resurrection. Crucified with Christ, the old self dies, and in his resurrection, we live a new life.

This new life involves a new way of seeing, a new way of being, a new way of living—indeed a new identity. To be “in Christ” means to live as a “new creation.” As a new creation “in Christ,” we are incorporated into the saving community, the body of Christ. This is a community in which boundaries that divided people are broken down, in which distinctions among people no longer matter.

In Paul’s day, the world was divided between Jews and Gentiles, slaves and free people, women and men. But Paul envisioned a Christian community that not only included all of these but also brought them into interdependent relationships. Part of the dramatic witness the church offered to first-century society was this attractive, alternative community of dissimilar people called into a higher unity in Christ.

Paul was a boundary breaker, always seeking to remove the barriers that divided people from one another and from God. And Paul teaches us that the church must be a boundary breaker too. Today our culture continues to be divided along lines of ethnicity, race, class, and gender. Yet, when we listen to Paul, we discover possibilities that can transcend our differences and join us into a common unity. Life in Christ is liberated life. A believer is no longer imprisoned by the prejudices, resentments, and jealousy that so often dominate human life. As Paul speaks to us, he speaks a message of “grace and peace.” When we extend grace to and make peace with one another, we become boundary breakers, and, in so doing, we offer a powerful witness of Christ to our world.

Meditatio

Consider how this Scripture passage is challenging you as a member of Christ’s body today.

  • How can the church respect differences and diversity among people while seeking a higher unity?
  • How can I become a boundary breaker and thus witness to Christ today?

Oratio

After listening with the church to God’s Word, respond in prayer to God with the new understanding you have gained.

Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, you have promised to extend the blessings of your salvation to all the people of the earth. As you called Paul to proclaim your gospel to the world, you have called your church to make disciples of all the nations. Enlighten and encourage me as I read and contemplate your inspired Word in the life and letters of Paul.

Continue praying from your heart . . .

Contemplatio

Spend some moments in quiet, placing your life in the life of Christ. Trust that God is creating you anew as he works deep within you.

 

©2011 by Stephen J. Binz. Published by Brazos Press. Unauthorized use of this material without expressed written permission is strictly prohibited.

Lenten Season Lectio Divina Series: Pilate’s Wife

This is the fifth entry in our Lenten series of posts taken from Stephen Binz’s Ancient-Future Bible Study: Experience Scripture through Lectio Divina. See our previous entries:

Week One: Abraham: “Ancestor of All”

Week Two:  David: “The Shepherd Who Is Also King”

Week Three: Sarah: “Listen to Sarah, the Quarry of Encouragement”

Week Four: Peter: “From Crumbled Failure to Rock of Strength”

Be sure to check out our videos that further explain this terrific series.

This week, we are posting a study from the introduction to Binz’s volume Women of the Gospels: Friends and Disciples of Jesus.

A Forgotten Advocate for Jesus

Lectio

Carefully read these words from Matthew’s Gospel, asking God’s Spirit to open your heart.

Matthew 27:15–19

15Now at the festival the governor was accustomed to release a prisoner for the crowd, anyone whom they wanted. 16At that time they had a notorious prisoner, called Jesus Barabbas. 17So after they had gathered, Pilate said to them, “Whom do you want me to release for you, Jesus Barabbas or Jesus who is called the Messiah?” 18For he realized that it was out of jealousy that they had handed him over. 19While he was sitting on the judgment seat, his wife sent word to him, “Have nothing to do with that innocent man, for today I have suffered a great deal because of a dream about him.”

Continue seeking the significance of this passage for Matthew’s passion account.

Pilate’s wife is another of those unnamed women of the Gospel accounts who plays a behind-the-scenes role in relationship to an influential man. She intervenes with her powerful husband to try to stop the condemnation of Jesus, an “innocent man.” She doesn’t even appear in the scene at Pilate’s judgment hall; her voice is heard only through a messenger. Only this single verse of Scripture mentions her, so we have no indication whether she had even seen Jesus or encountered him during his ministry in Jerusalem.

The Gospel of Matthew sets up a dramatic contrast between the religious leaders who plead for Jesus Barabbas and Pilate’s wife, who pleads for Jesus the Messiah. The leaders are motivated by “jealousy,” while Pilate’s wife seeks justice for Jesus because of the truth revealed to her in a dream. Both the Jews and Romans took dreams very seriously, and Matthew’s account of Jesus’s birth had already shown how the Gentile magi received God’s warning in a dream in order to save the newborn’s life (2:12). Now, in this account of Jesus’s death, this Gentile woman intercedes to try to save the life of the Jewish Messiah.

Her pleading is ultimately unsuccessful as her vacillating husband gives in to the pressure of the crowds. The Gospel doesn’t tell us what happened to Pilate’s wife, either immediately after the crucifixion of Jesus when she encountered her husband again, or the direction of her life from then on. However, the indication that she “suffered a great deal” for Jesus, a New Testament indicator of discipleship, may hint at the later tradition that she became a follower of Christ.

Meditatio

Imagine and consider the behind-the-scenes drama taking place in the heart of Pilate’s wife while her husband sits on the judgment seat.

What might be some of the motivations of Pilate’s wife in urging her husband to have nothing to do with the murder of this innocent man? What does it tell me about the importance of suffering for the truth?

After the death of Jesus “suffered under Pontius Pilate,” what might be some of the conversation between Pilate and his wife? What can I learn and imitate from her witness?

Oratio

Respond in prayer to God, who gives you new insights and hope through listening to his Word.

God of all creation, you created man and woman in your image and sent Jesus the Christ to teach us how to live together in your love. Jesus drew forth the courage and beauty of the women of the Gospels and brought restoration and hope to their lives. He wept with them in their pains, laughed with them in their joys, affirmed them in their resiliency, and empowered their lives with confident trust. Bless my life as I listen, reflect, and pray with the Gospel texts of these women. Transform my life as you did theirs with the power of your Word.

Continue to pray to God from your heart . . .

Contemplatio

Remain in peaceful quiet and place yourself in God’s loving embrace. Ask God to give you whatever gift he desires for you during these moments.

©2011 by Stephen J. Binz. Published by Brazos Press. Unauthorized use of this material without expressed written permission is strictly prohibited.

Lenten Season Lectio Divina Series: David

This is the second entry in our Lenten series of posts taken from Stephen Binz’s Ancient-Future Bible Study: Experience Scripture through Lectio Divina. Last week we introduced the concept of lectio divina and posted a study on Abraham. Be sure to check out our videos that further explain this terrific series.

This week, we are posting a study from the introduction to Binz’s volume David: Shepherd and King of Israel.

The Shepherd Who Is Also King

Lectio

Read this prophetic text as God’s Word to his people. Listen with your heart to these comforting words.

Ezekiel 34:23–24

23I will set up over them one shepherd, my servant David, and he shall feed them: he shall feed them and be their shepherd. 24And I, the Lord, will be their God, and my servant David shall be prince among them; I, the Lord, have spoken.

Continue searching for the text’s meaning in these comments about Israel’s tradition.

When the people of Israel clamored to Samuel for a king to rule them, God’s prophet warned them of the cost of that decision (1 Sam. 8). A king would conscript their children into his army, extract forced labor for his many building projects, and tax their produce to support his royal court. However, the people were determined to have a king to fight their battles so that they would be “like the other nations” (1 Sam. 8:5) in security and prestige. But Israel was decidedly not like other nations. Its identity was bound up in its unique relationship with God. The Lord was Israel’s king.

God reluctantly tells Samuel to allow Israel’s request for a king, though not without expressing reservations. The monarchy in Israel is one more step in Israel’s unwillingness to accept God as the source and rule of its life. Indeed, all the warnings that Samuel uttered come to pass time and again throughout the history of Israel’s kingdom. Concentration of wealth, confiscation of land, political oppression, and, most significantly, a reduced practice of covenantal faith are all results of the abuses of state power brought about by the monarchy.

In granting Israel’s request for a king, God was already looking beyond the failed kingship of Saul to the rule of David, the shepherd-king. Through the metaphor of the shepherd, the biblical writers demonstrate David’s vocation to shepherd God’s people in imitation of God’s pastoral care. The Lord seeks out and rescues his sheep, bringing them to safe pasture in their own land. They lie down in good grazing land and feed on the rich pasture of Israel. The book of Samuel presents David’s rise to the throne, beginning with the young shepherd caring for his father’s sheep (1 Sam. 16) and continuing with God’s choice of David, the shepherd-king. God said, “It is you who shall be shepherd of my people Israel, you who shall be ruler over Israel” (2 Sam. 5:2).

Through the centuries, the prophets reminded Israel’s kings that the “good shepherd” exists for the sake of the sheep, to guard, feed, nurture, and protect the flock. The false shepherd, by contrast, acts as though the sheep exist for the enrichment and interests of the shepherd. As the monarchy of Israel crumbled, the hopes of Israel turned to a Messiah from the line of David. The prophet Ezekiel, speaking centuries after the reign of King David, awaits a new David, the messianic king who would rise to shepherd God’s scattered flock.

The New Testament writers extend the image of the shepherd to characterize the mission of Jesus. As the climactic fulfillment of David’s dynastic line, Jesus is born in Bethlehem, the hometown of David, and sent to be the “good shepherd” of God’s people. This new David, Israel’s truest shepherd, gathers the scattered flock from throughout the earth. With compassion he seeks out the lost sheep, rejoices in his find, and brings it home. He knows the sheep by name, and they respond to his voice. His death is interpreted as a complete sacrifice of the shepherd for the sheep: “The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep” (John 10:11).

Taking the biblical literature as a whole, the image of the shepherd, beginning with King David, expresses a divine understanding of power and governance. In opposition to the empires of Egypt, Babylon, and Rome, exercising oppressive power to subjugate and control their people, the rule of God’s kingdom is one of freedom, nonviolence, justice, and peace. Certainly the historical life of David did not approach the ideal of God’s reign, but David is a channel through which God’s kingship is expressed in the world. He is fallible yet heroic, sinful yet forgiven, errant yet passionate, ambitious, and courageous. David, the shepherd-king, remains always a man after God’s own heart.

Meditatio

Consider the biblical image of shepherd leadership and its implications for your belief and discipleship.

In what ways did God prepare his people for the universal reign of Jesus Christ through the kingdom of David? How can understanding David help me to understand Jesus?

Why does God’s Word present the image of shepherding as a kind of ruling in the kingdom of God? What would this kind of governance do for our world today?

Oratio

Respond in prayer to God, who always listens to your voice.

God of Abraham, Moses, and David, you are our Lord, our Shepherd, and our King. You looked into the heart of David and chose him as Israel’s shepherd and king. Your anointed sovereign became a channel of your rule over the world and a shadow of the everlasting reign of your Messiah. Give me the heroic virtue, courage, and dedication of David. Help me to learn from his life how to rejoice, sing, pray, and trust in you. As I listen to, reflect on, and pray these texts of the Hebrew Scriptures, mold my heart to be like your own.

Continue to pray to God from your heart . . .

Contemplatio

Remain in peaceful quiet for a few minutes and be aware of God’s shepherding care for you. Feel the passionate desire of God to work deeply in your life to make you his own.

©2011 by Stephen J. Binz. Published by Brazos Press. Unauthorized use of this material without expressed written permission is strictly prohibited.

Lenten Season Lectio Divina Series: Abraham

During the Lenten season, we will be running a series of posts from Stephen Binz’s Ancient-Future Bible Study: Experience Scripture through Lectio Divina. For the next six Tuesdays, we will be posting from each of Binz’s entries in the series – beginning today with Abraham.

First, some background to the series and style:

“Ancient Future Bible Study unites contemporary study of the Bible with an experience of the church’s most ancient way of reading Scripture, lectio divina. By combining the old and the new in a fertile synthesis, this study helps modern people encounter the sacra pagina, the inspired text, as God intends it for the church. Through solid historical and literary study and the time-honored practice of lectio divina, the mind and the heart are brought into an experience of God through a careful and prayerful reading of the biblical texts (taken from Abraham, ix).”

For more on lectio divina (including a description of each of its movements) check out the excerpt from the Abraham study. You can also hear Stephen Binz’s description here.

Today’s study is called “Ancestor of Us All” and is taken from Abraham: Father of All Believers.

Ancestor of Us All

Lectio

Read this inspired text, listening for its fuller meaning in light of the whole plan of God.

Romans 4:11–12

11[Abraham] received the sign of circumcision as a seal of the righteousness that he had by faith while he was still uncircumcised. The purpose was to make him the ancestor of all who believe without being circumcised and who thus have righteousness reckoned to them, 12 and likewise the ancestor of the circumcised who are not only circumcised but who also follow the example of the faith that our ancestor Abraham had before he was circumcised.

Continue exploring the meaning of Paul’s words through the tradition of the church.

In writing to the Christians in Rome, Paul demonstrates that Abraham is “the ancestor of all who believe” (v. 11). For the early church, this meant that both Jewish and Gentile followers of Jesus, the circumcised and the uncircumcised, could enter a saving relationship with God and thus claim Abraham as their father. Neither is pitted against the other. All people can become descendants of Abraham by sharing his faith. In the life of Abraham, as Paul demonstrates, faith was the priority. Abraham was made righteous before God through his faithful trust. His circumcision was a subsequent seal of his righteousness, not the producer of his saving relationship with God. Thus Abraham is the bearer of God’s promised blessings to all people, not just the Jewish people. All who believe in the God of Abraham are Abraham’s children.

Meditatio

Consider the meaning of this Scripture passage in the context of your own life in Christ today.

In what ways do people sometimes erect unnecessary barriers that divide people rather than unify them?

How can faith in the God of Abraham be a means of dialogue and understanding among Jews, Christians, and Muslims?

Oratio

Respond in prayer with the hope that arises within you.

God of Abraham, Sarah, and Hagar, you have promised blessings to all the peoples of the earth. Open my heart to a spirit of forgiveness toward those who share my life, and help me be a minister of reconciliation to struggling and broken people. May the peace you desire for the world begin through an understanding of the inspired texts of our ancestors in faith. Enlighten and encourage me as I read and contemplate your inspired Word in these sacred Scriptures. Show me how to make my life a testimony to God’s love.

Continue to pray to God from your heart . . .

Contemplatio

Remain in quiet and place yourself under God’s loving gaze. Ask God to give you an experience of shalom (Hebrew), salaam (Arabic), peace.

Operatio

How can I best dedicate myself to the reflective study of these sacred texts of Abraham over the coming weeks? What regular place and time could I choose for the quiet practice of lectio divina?

How can faith in the God of Abraham be a means of dialogue and understanding among Jews, Christians, and Muslims?

Oratio

Respond in prayer with the hope that arises within you.

God of Abraham, Sarah, and Hagar, you have promised blessings to all the peoples of the earth. Open my heart to a spirit of forgiveness toward those who share my life, and help me be a minister of reconciliation to struggling and broken people. May the peace you desire for the world begin through an understanding of the inspired texts of our ancestors in faith. Enlighten and encourage me as I read and contemplate your inspired Word in these sacred Scriptures. Show me how to make my life a testimony to God’s love.

Continue to pray to God from your heart . . .

Contemplatio

Remain in quiet and place yourself under God’s loving gaze. Ask God to give you an experience of shalom (Hebrew), salaam (Arabic), peace.

©2011 by Stephen J. Binz. Published by Brazos Press. Unauthorized use of this material without expressed written permission is strictly prohibited.

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For more information on the Ancient-Future Bible Study series, click here.

The Weekly Hit List: October 28, 2011

Pastor Bob Cornwall reviewed A Public Faith on his blog Ponderings on a Faith Journey. Check it out here.

 

Also, look for a great review of Lee C. Camp’s Who Is My Enemy? in the Nov/Dec issue of Relevant magazine.

Rachel Held Evans recently featured two Brazos titles on her blog.

First, she recommended Christian Smith’s The Bible Made Impossible and previewed a series of posts that she will be doing on the book in January.

Then, she strongly recommended Stephen Binz’s Women of the Gospels and Women of the Torah studies (part of the Ancient-Future Bible Study series).

 

Hip-Hop Redemption Book Giveaway

Congratulations to Patrick Craig, Andy Goodliff, Nathan Gilmor, Ken Berry, and Jared Yaple! These five lucky winners will receive a free copy of Ralph Basui Watkins’s new book Hip-Hop Redemption: Finding God in the Rhythm and the Rhyme.

For more on Hip-Hop Redemption, check out www.HipHopRedemption.org.

And check back next week for our next giveaway!