The Weekly Hit List: January 4, 2013

Some of the Best of the Best of 2012:

The Evolution of Adam

The Evolution of Adam by Peter Enns was included as a “Best Book of the Year” by Rachel Held Evans.

It was also one of Brian LePort‘sTop Ten Books I Read This Year“:

“I finished this book with the conclusion that the Gospel does not depend on the historicity of Adam, but that doesn’t mean that this discussion is meaningless. A lot has to change for conservative Christians if they decide to abandon the historicity of Adam. Debates over everything from the nature of Scripture, to hermeneutics, to worldview, to gender roles, to eschatology can be impacted by one’s understanding of Adam (and Eve).

“If you are not satisfied with the ‘Bible v. Science’ paradigm this book may be a useful tool in beginning to reassess how you think about a lot of things.”

 

The Space Between

 

The Space Between by Eric O. Jacobsen, author of Sidewalks in the Kingdom, was the “Best provocative new book” of the “Best of 2012 in green community solutions,” according to Kaid Benfield (Director of Sustainable Communities for the National Resources Defense Council):

“This one was a very tough call, given The Walkable City . . . and Chuck Marohn’s . . . Thoughts on Building Strong Towns. But my nod goes to Eric Jacobsen’s Christian case for cities, The Space Between, because of its freshness.”

The Space Between was also an Honorable Mention on Englewood Review of Book’s Best Books of 2012 list.

 

Quick Hits:

Matthew Dickerson, author of A Hobbit Journey, was interviewed by Jeffrey Overstreet. Read part 1. Read part 2.

Living into Focus by Arthur Boers was reviewed by Mennonite World Review

Testing Scripture by John Polkinghorne was included in a post on Jesus Creed.

 

Ebook Specials and Other Offers:

January ebook specials are currently running for multiple Brazos Press and Baker Academic titles. All of these are at least 40% off.

Commentary on the New Testament by Robert H. Gundry
The Character of Christian Scripture by Christopher R. Seitz
Creator Spirit by Steven R. Guthrie
Dictionary of Scripture and Ethics edited by Joel B. Green
Genesis (BTCB) by R. R. Reno
Flawed Families of the Bible by David E. Garland and Diana R. Garland
Cross-Shattered Christ by Stanley Hauerwas
The Forgotten Ways Handbook by Alan Hirsch with Darryn Altclass

The Weekly Hit List: December 7, 2012

The Space Between by Eric O. Jacobsen, author of Sidewalks in the Kingdom, was reviewed by Byron Borger of Hearts & Minds Books for Comment magazine

“Since Jacobsen’s 2003 Brazos Press introductory book Sidewalks of the Kingdom, many were hoping that the Presbyterian pastor turned new urbanist would write a more substantial follow up, taking readers further into the fascinating study of our built environment.

“His nearly decade of further study, writing, speaking, and engaging this interdisciplinary field has paid off with extraordinary fruitfulness, and Jacobsen’s new book is, without a doubt, one of the most important books in the field, and should be considered to be one of the most important books of the year.”

Read the rest of the review here.

 

Quick Hits:

Lee C. Camp, author of Who Is My Enemy?, was interviewed on “Kresta in the Afternoon” on Ave Maria Radio on December 3, 2012.

A Hobbit Journey by Matthew Dickerson was reviewed in Family Fiction.

The Bible Made Impossible by Christian Smith was recommended by Andrew Wilson on the Theology Matters blog.

Living into Focus by Arthur Boers was recommended by Dana Cassell.

Frank G. Honeycutt, author of The Truth Shall Make You Odd, wrote an article for The Christian Century: “New life without parole.” (The full text is available to subscribers only.)

Soulful Spirituality by David Benner was recommended by Barry Pearman.

 

Ebook Specials and Other Offers:

December ebook specials are currently running for multiple Brazos Press and Baker Academic titles. All of these are at least 60% off.

The Virtuous Reader by Richard S. Briggs
Healing in the Bible by Frederick J. Gaiser
1 & 2 Kings (BTCB) by Peter J. Leithart
Broken Hallelujahs by Christian Scharen
Claiming Abraham by Michael Lodahl
Where Mortals Dwell by Craig G. Bartholomew
The Forgotten Ways Handbook by Alan Hirsch with Darryn Altclass
The Vampire Defanged by Susannah Clements
Adventures in Daily Prayer by Bert Ghezzi
Seven Deadly Spirits by T. Scott Daniels

The Weekly Hit List: November 30, 2012

A Hobbit Journey by Matthew Dickerson was reviewed by Lawrence E. Garcia.

“Not many, including myself at one point in time, would have considered mythology an avenue to the betterment of the world in which we live, but after reading Matthew Dickerson’s A Hobbit Journey: Discovering the Enchantment of J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle-Earth I not only consider this genre a valid option, but a necessary one.

“After all, Tolkien’s world is ‘in some sense connected to our own history’ (albeit only culturally and literarily); it is not merely a never-never land as Tolkien himself might say, but a tall tale that is meant to incite our hearts and imaginations to set in motion a more transcendent way of life for all earth’s inhabitants.”

Read the rest of the review here.

 

 

Quick Hits:

The Space Between by Eric O. Jacobsen, author of Sidewalks in the Kingdom, was reviewed by Elliot Ritzema.

The Evolution of Adam by Peter Enns was reviewed by Brian LePort.

God and Charles Dickens by Gary L. Colledge was reviewed by Mark Braye.

 

Ebook Specials and Other Offers:

Today is the last day our November ebook specials are running for multiple Brazos Press and Baker Academic titles. All of these are at least 60% off.

Luke (BTCB) by David Lyle Jeffrey
Beginnings by Peter C. Bouteneff
Creation Untamed by Terence E. Fretheim
From Stone to Living Word by Debbie Blue
Evangelicals and Empire by Bruce Ellis Benson and Peter Goodwin Heltzel
The Forgotten Ways Handbook by Alan Hirsch with Darryn Altclass
God in the Gallery by Daniel A. Siedell
The Vampire Defanged by Susannah Clements
Adventures in Daily Prayer by Bert Ghezzi
Seven Deadly Spirits by T. Scott Daniels

The Weekly Hit List: November 16, 2012

The Space Between by Eric Jacobsen, author of Sidewalks in the Kingdom, was reviewed by Comment Magazine.

“It is a fact that fast-growing churches in North America for the past few decades have been mostly suburban, mostly large, and mostly located on huge parcels of land surrounded by even huger parking lots. Reading The Space Between questions all these practices, from a theological as well as a practical point of view.

“This is a book that was needed fifty years ago or more, but as Anthony Hopkins says in The Mask of Zorro, ‘When the pupil is ready, the teacher will come.’

“Perhaps in this day, in our time, the pupil, the church, is ready to hear what the teacher, Eric Jacobsen, has to say.

His is a prophetic voice that needs to be heard.”
Read the rest of the review here.
 

Quick Hits:

The Bible Made Impossible by Christian Smith was reviewed by Brian LePort on the Near Emmaus blog.

Who Is My Enemy? by Lee C. Camp was reviewed by pastor Stephen Barkley.

Brian LePort has concluded his series on the “historicity” of Adam, comparing The Evolution of Adam by Peter Enns and Did Adam and Eve Really Exist? by C. John Collins. All 25 posts are available here.

 

Ebook Specials and Other Offers:

November ebook specials are currently running for multiple Brazos Press and Baker Academic titles. All of these are at least 60% off.

Luke (BTCB) by David Lyle Jeffrey
Beginnings by Peter C. Bouteneff
Creation Untamed by Terence E. Fretheim
From Stone to Living Word by Debbie Blue
Evangelicals and Empire by Bruce Ellis Benson and Peter Goodwin Heltzel
The Forgotten Ways Handbook by Alan Hirsch with Darryn Altclass
God in the Gallery by Daniel A. Siedell
The Vampire Defanged by Susannah Clements
Adventures in Daily Prayer by Bert Ghezzi
Seven Deadly Spirits by T. Scott Daniels

The Weekly Hit List: October 19, 2012

An excerpt from Just Politics by Ronald J. Sider was posted on RelevantMagazine.com.

“. . .nonviolence frequently works! Even without much preparation and training, even without a large investment of money and personnel, nonviolent direct action has frequently been highly effective.

“One wonders what might be accomplished if all parts of the Christian church (in cooperation with all others who are interested) would get serious about investing resources, time, money, and people to explore what more could be done nonviolently to end injustice and prevent war.”

Read more of “War, Pacifism and a Third Option: Ron Sider explains how there’s a middle ground in the war debate” here.

 

Quick Hits:

Just Politics by Ronald J. Sider was recommended by Eric Roseberry on his blog.

The Space Between by Eric Jacobsen, author of Sidewalks in the Kingdom, was reviewed by Englewood Review of Books.

The Space Between was also reviewed by Kaid Benfield on The Atlantic Cities blog.

 

Ebook Specials and Other Offers:

October ebook specials are currently running for multiple Brazos Press and Baker Academic titles. All of these are at least 75% off.

Deconstructing Theodicy by David B. Burrell
Song of Songs (BTCB series) by Paul J. Griffiths
Under the Influence by Monica Ganas
The Mind and the Machine by Matthew Dickerson
John (Paideia series) by Jo-Ann A. Brant
The Fall of Interpretation by James K. A. Smith
Killing Enmity by Thomas R. Yoder Neufield
Finding Your Plot in a Plotless World by Daniel de Roulet
Second Corinthians (CCSS series) by Thomas D. Stegman, SJ
A Liturgy of Grief by Leslie C. Allen

Between the Lines: A Conversation with Eric O. Jacobsen -Part 2

Eric O. JacobsenBrazos readers know Eric O. Jacobsen from his 2003 book Sidewalks in the Kingdom: New Urbanism and the Christian Faith. Eric has just released a new work with our sister division, Baker Academic, titled The Space Between: A Christian Engagement with the Built Environment.

Eric O. Jacobsen (PhD, Fuller Theological Seminary) is senior pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Tacoma, Washington. Along with Sidewalks in the Kingdom and The Space Between, he is the author of numerous articles exploring connections between the Christian community, the church, and traditional neighborhoods.

We recently got a chance to ask Eric a few questions about The Space Between.

Last week, Eric discussed the relationship between his latest work and Sidewalks in the Kingdom.

Today, he tells us more about the history and message of The Space Between.

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Tell us a little bit about The Space Between. What is the main argument or purpose of your book? Why did you feel compelled to write it?

I sense that there is a major cultural discussion going on right now about geography.  On the one hand, the popularity of the internet, cell phones, and social networking technologies seems to be telling us that geography doesn’t matter and we can have a rich experience of community wherever we happen to be. On the other hand, there seems to be an equally strong localist movement that wants to assert that geography and place are intensely important. Farmers’ markets are popping up all over the place, cities are tearing up arterial streets to put in bike lanes, and there is a lot of emphasis on shopping local and investing in our neighborhoods. This discussion is going on all around us, but we lack a comprehensive framework and a vocabulary to make sense of it. If public interaction with other people is important, why is it so, and how does the shape of our public spaces impact our experience of community? I wrote The Space Between to help the Christian community understand this conversation and to equip us to engage it in meaningful ways.

In your book, you challenge your readers to look at the built environment theologically as a place for human thriving and Christian discipleship. What do you believe are the greatest obstacles for this? What are a few examples of how this plays out on a practical level?

The Space BetweenI think that the greatest obstacle to understanding the theological implications of the built environment is our fragmented pattern of thinking. We think about each day in terms of what we need to accomplish, and then we think of each of those things as separate activities to be done in separate places. We need to run a few errands, we need to work out, and we need to spend time with our kids, so we schedule a trip to the grocery store, the gym, and the park. The automobile allows us to accomplish these things in a single afternoon, even though each activity may be twenty to thirty minutes away from the others. We can get those things accomplished, but the experience of getting through that list is going to leave us feeling harried and disconnected.

In the not too distant past, a person might have walked to the grocery store with her kids, which would have allowed all three activities to be accomplished in an overlapping and holistic way. Putting together communities that allow for this kind of multivalent interaction takes more work then just building a strip mall in the middle of nowhere, but ultimately it is these settings that help us live as integrated beings and build up human community. In The Space Between, I try to lay some of the groundwork for building settings that do a better job connecting us to one another and to our world.

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For more information on The Space Between, click here.
To read an excerpt, click here.

Between the Lines: A Conversation with Eric O. Jacobsen -Part 1

Eric O. JacobsenBrazos readers know Eric O. Jacobsen from his 2003 book Sidewalks in the Kingdom: New Urbanism and the Christian Faith. Eric has just released a new work with our sister division, Baker Academic, titled The Space Between: A Christian Engagement with the Built Environment.

Eric O. Jacobsen (PhD, Fuller Theological Seminary) is senior pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Tacoma, Washington. Along with Sidewalks in the Kingdom and The Space Between, he is the author of numerous articles exploring connections between the Christian community, the church, and traditional neighborhoods.

We recently got a chance to ask Eric a few questions about The Space Between. In today’s post, Eric speaks to the relationship between his latest work and Sidewalks in the Kingdom.

How does The Space Between compliment or continue the discussion raised by your previous book Sidewalks in the Kingdom?

Sidewalks in the KingdomI can’t believe that it has almost been 10 years since Sidewalks was first published.  While I continue to be encouraged when I hear from people who are encountering that work for the first time and are resonating with its claims, I also am aware that a lot has happened both in the development of my thinking and with the way this conversation has played out culturally over the past decade.  Sidewalks is more of a personal narrative exploring my discovery of this important topic.  Since writing it, I have completed a PhD in Theology and Culture and shared these ideas with very diverse audiences around the country.  In The Space Between, I try to attack this topic in a more disciplined way and show how it connects to other conversations going on in the academy and the culture at large.

The Space BetweenThe other thing that has changed since Sidewalks was published is our cultural context. When I wrote Sidewalks, the idea of a pedestrian friendly neighborhood or shopping district were still pretty radical ideas.  Now you see a much broader acceptance of these ideas among planners, developers, and even citizens; but questions about the human role is building community are re-emerging with greater urgency.  If we learn to build neighborhoods again as opposed to subdivisions, will people all of a sudden start acting neighborly?  That is a question that seems to invite a response from the Christian community.  The Space Between can be seen as a first attempt to answer that question, but I hope that lots of other Christians weigh in with their own answers to that question.

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For more information on The Space Between, click here.
To read an excerpt, click here.