Ebook Special for We Were the Least of These by Elaine Heath

Now through June 12, the ebook of We Were the Least of These: Reading the Bible with Survivors of Sexual Abuse by Elaine A. Heath is only $1.99 (90% off) from the following participating retailers:

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

CBD

“The journey toward healing can be a lonely one for survivors of sexual abuse who feel–and often are treated–like ‘the least of these’ children of God. Imagine the surprise ending: Jesus himself was the least of these! For Elaine Heath, this ending is just the beginning. This book fills a gap in the literature and I affirm its value as a professor, pastoral counselor, and minister.”
—Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner, professor of pastoral care, Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University; fellow, American Association of Pastoral Counselors

Much of what is written about abuse and the Bible focuses on the ways Scripture is used to hurt rather than heal. This accessibly written book provides a much-needed perspective, illuminating the good news of healing and liberation that the Bible offers survivors of sexual abuse. As a theologian and survivor of abuse herself, Elaine Heath handles this sensitive topic with compassion and grace. She offers a close reading of several biblical passages that have proven to be profoundly healing for her and for other survivors. The book is illustrated with stories and insights from sexual abuse survivors who have experienced healing through the Bible in order to bring hope and encouragement to victims. It will be welcome reading for those who have suffered from abuse as well as for pastors, counselors, therapists, and others who minister to them. Each chapter ends with two sets of reflection questions and recommended activities–one set for survivors and another for those who journey with them.

Elaine A. Heath (PhD, Duquesne University) is McCreless Associate Professor of Evangelism and director of the Center for Missional Wisdom at Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, in Dallas, Texas. An ordained elder in The United Methodist Church, she is a frequent retreat speaker and has experience as a pastor and spiritual director. She is also the author of The Mystic Way of Evangelism.

Ebook Special for We Were the Least of These by Elaine A. Heath

The ebook for We Were the Least of These: Reading the Bible with Survivors of Sexual Abuse by Elaine A. Heath is only $3.99—80% off!

More information and a list of participating retailers is available here.

 

“The journey toward healing can be a lonely one for survivors of sexual abuse who feel–and often are treated–like ‘the least of these’ children of God. Imagine the surprise ending: Jesus himself was the least of these! For Elaine Heath, this ending is just the beginning. This book fills a gap in the literature and I affirm its value as a professor, pastoral counselor, and minister.”
—Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner, professor of pastoral care, Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University; fellow, American Association of Pastoral Counselors

Much of what is written about abuse and the Bible focuses on the ways Scripture is used to hurt rather than heal. This accessibly written book provides a much-needed perspective, illuminating the good news of healing and liberation that the Bible offers survivors of sexual abuse. As a theologian and survivor of abuse herself, Elaine Heath handles this sensitive topic with compassion and grace. She offers a close reading of several biblical passages that have proven to be profoundly healing for her and for other survivors. The book is illustrated with stories and insights from sexual abuse survivors who have experienced healing through the Bible in order to bring hope and encouragement to victims. It will be welcome reading for those who have suffered from abuse as well as for pastors, counselors, therapists, and others who minister to them. Each chapter ends with two sets of reflection questions and recommended activities–one set for survivors and another for those who journey with them.

Elaine A. Heath (PhD, Duquesne University) is McCreless Associate Professor of Evangelism and director of the Center for Missional Wisdom at Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, in Dallas, Texas. An ordained elder in The United Methodist Church, she is a frequent retreat speaker and has experience as a pastor and spiritual director. She is also the author of The Mystic Way of Evangelism.

The Weekly Hit List: September 21, 2012

God and Charles Dickens by Gary L. Colledge was reviewed by Comment Magazine

“Gary L. Colledge’s God and Charles Dickens: Recovering the Christian Voice of a Classic Author (Brazos 2012) makes the convincing case that behind each of Dickens’s novels is a consistent vision of Christ’s ministry of reconciliation. . . . This is an aspect of Dickens that we have not heard enough about this year, the 200th anniversary of his birth, neither in the public commemorations nor in the academic press.”

You can read the rest of the review here.

 

God and Charles Dickens was also reviewed by Gene C. Fant Jr. for The Gospel Coalition.

“Gary Colledge’s helpful work, published on the 200th anniversary of the author’s birth, urges Christian readers in particular to consider rescuing Dickens from the literary quicksand of the past. . . . Colledge, adjunct professor at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago and Walsh University in Canton, Ohio, proposes that Dickens’s voice is as relevant today as it was in the past, as his works address significant issues of poverty, justice, personal hypocrisy, and faith.”

You can read the rest of Fant’s review here.

 

Gary Colledge was also featured in an interview last week with Dr. Bill Maier on Faith Radio.

 

Quick Hits:

Speaking of Dying by Fred Craddock, Dale Goldsmith, and Joy V. Goldsmith was reviewed by Englewood Review of Books.

A Public Faith by Miroslav Volf was reviewed by The Christian Chronicle.

A Hobbit Journey by Matthew Dickerson was reviewed by Jeffrey Overstreet on his Patheos blog.

The Bible Made Impossible by Christian Smith was recommended in Religious Herald.

Peter Enns, author of The Evolution of Adam, was interviewed on Beyond the Box podcast.
Listen to: “The Nature of Scripture and the Question of Evolution with Peter Enns.”

We Were the Least of These by Elaine A. Heath was reviewed by Scott Endress on ClergySpirit and shared on the The Methoblog.

Arthur Boers, author of Living into Focus, was quoted extensively in the article “Virtual Virtue” on pages 18-23 of the July/August 2012 issue of Faith Today.

 

Ebook Specials and Other Offers:

September ebook specials are currently running for multiple Brazos Press and Baker Academic titles. All of these are at least 50% off.

Who Is My Enemy? by Lee. C. Camp
A Public Faith by Miroslav Volf
Christians and the Common Good by Charles E. Gutenson
War and the American Difference by Stanley Hauerwas
The Politics of Discipleship by Graham Ward
Christians at the Border by M. Daniel Carroll R.
Hope in Troubled Times by Bob Goudzwaard and David Van Heemst and Mark Vander Vennen

Behind the Book: Elaine Heath

© Love Photography

Dear Readers,

I wrote this book because, as a survivor of abuse, I wish something like it had been available for me to read when I began my own process of intentional healing. While there were a number of valuable therapeutic resources that did help me, I could not find any books that offered a healing and liberating interpretation of the Bible that was especially focused on the experiences, much less the wisdom, of survivors of sexual abuse. Nothing that I read suggested that survivors have a perspective on biblical interpretation that is sorely needed not just by other survivors, but by the entire church. Because no one told me I might have wisdom precisely because of my experience, I couldn’t properly honor my own story as a triumph of God’s power. It took so much longer to heal from the shame than it needed to! If I had been taught what is in this book, what a difference it would have made in coming into freedom and wholeness and in rejecting other forms of oppression in my life.

The evangelical books I read that addressed healing from sexual abuse seemed mostly oriented toward the brokenness of survivors, and survivors’ need to heal. Books focusing on sexuality in general tended to define sexual virtue in terms of chastity and lifelong monogamy with a heterosexual spouse. Conversely, sexual sin was defined as promiscuity, adultery, fornication, homosexuality, and divorce. I could not find any resources that named what I knew to be true: sexual abuse is not only a sexual sin, but is the worst sexual sin. I encountered the opposite problem in theologically liberal resources: a feminist critique of Scripture that rejected its authority because of its “unforgivable patriarchy.” For some of these books the Bible was nothing more than a religious artifact that contributed to the subjugation of women, children, and the earth.

My healing from abuse has been deeply embedded in my vocation as a theologian, pastor, and spiritual companion to others. Because I had the privilege of studying in diverse theological streams–evangelical, mainline Protestant, and Catholic–I gradually discovered many treasures from all these traditions that helped to open the Bible’s wealth of healing wisdom to me. Over the years, as I have served in ministry with other survivors, I have witnessed the healing power of the Bible in their lives, too.

This book is grounded in two commitments: first, the Bible can be a powerful source of healing for survivors of abuse. Second, survivors who are healing have essential theological wisdom that the whole church needs in order to be the people God has called us to be in this world.

With a prayer of trust that God is in the process of healing all wounds,

Elaine A. Heath